WWT

British Steel Hide

Over the weekend there where 200 Black-tailed Godwit, 80 Lapwing as well as a number of Greenshank and Redshank. Out on the estuary Shelduck number in the hundreds. The resident Spoonbill continues to make regular appearances in front of the steel hide. Work is currently being conducted on the sea wall by so there may not be as many Waders visible from the hide. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Millennium Wetlands

Good numbers waterfowl have been seen around the wetlands including, 83 Gadwall, 33 Tufted Ducks, 30 Teal as well as groups of Shoveler, Shelduck and Wigeon. A single male Pintail has been spotted regularly from the Herons Wing hide. 13 Snipe have been seen on the stone islands in front of the Peter Scott Hide. A flock of 8 Siskin has been spotted around the pond walk area as well as groups of Goldfinch and Cetti’s Warblers. Our most recent sighting of the Otter was on Monday by the new screens on the Northern loop of the reserve.

 

]]> https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-12th-15th-january/feed/ 0 Wader Lake essential works – Jan 2019 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-news-washington/wader-lake-essential-works-jan-2019/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-news-washington/wader-lake-essential-works-jan-2019/#respond Tue, 15 Jan 2019 11:14:27 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85632  WWT Washington’s reserve team will be carrying out some essential maintenance on Wader Lake this week (Wednesday 16 and Thursday 17 January 2019). 

The dedicated team of staff and volunteers at WWT Washington will be renewing and enhancing the existing shingle islands for the benefit of the breeding birds they attract each spring. This process involves tonnes of gravel being brought onto the lake to re-line the surface of the islands and help make this an attractive habitat for nesting birds.

John Gowland, Reserve Manager at Washington commented: “The team will be enhancing the shingle islands this week to rebuild and create the ideal substrate for returning avocet, common tern and little-ringed plover that breed here at WWT Washington each spring.

“We have a limited window of time to make these improvements as grey heron numbers are already starting to rise on site and along the river. At their peak, they form one of the best nesting colonies in the UK and it’s vital that we don’t risk disturbing them during this crucial period.

“Disturbance on the lake and the lowering of water levels will be unavoidable for these couple of days but will hopefully see improved numbers of breeding birds this year. We thank all our visitors for their understanding as we get stuck into our task.”

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Wildlife sightings – 15/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-15-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-15-01-19/#respond Tue, 15 Jan 2019 10:42:07 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85630 a.m. Tide Level: High

Wader Lake

Lapwing 36

Curlew 19

Canada goose 10

Shelduck 21

Shoveller 4

Black-headed gull 5

Grey heron 6

Redshank 1

Teal 15

Saline Lagoon

Curlew 19

Carrier crow 1

Hawthorn Wood

Bullfinch 18

Blue tit 8

Goldfinch 9

Redpoll 6

Dunnock 1

Great tit 6

Chaffinch 11

Brambling 10

Long-tailed tits 2

Willow tit 1

Nuthatch 1

Reed bunting 1

Other birds

Goldeneye – 1 – River Wear

Wren – 1 – Wader Lake footpath

Blackbird – 3 – Wader Lake footpath

Coal tit – 2 – Saline Meadow path

Wood pigeon – 7 – Saline Lagoon / Lagoon view hide path

Tufted duck – 53 – Reservoir

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Siskin along the South route https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/siskin-along-the-south-route/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/siskin-along-the-south-route/#respond Tue, 15 Jan 2019 09:59:57 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85626 Siskin feeding on Alder cones

2 Bittern – main lake (North shore & close to Headley hide)

6 Pintail – main lake

1 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

3 Siskin – South route

1 Peregrine – hunting over the main lake

1 Kestrel – South route

January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Bittern, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Kestrel, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Water Pipit, Kingfisher, Siskin.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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White-fronts in the Four Score again https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/white-fronts-in-the-four-score-again/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/white-fronts-in-the-four-score-again/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 17:01:54 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85616 Rushy Hide

Good roost of Bewick’s Swans with 110 birds on site. One of the satellite transmitter birds (Catalana) visited Gwent (Llandegfedd/Usk) over the weekend.

Martin Smith Hide

No reports of the Jack Snipe today but Common Snipe, Chiffchaff and Cetti’s Warbler.

Tack Piece

Dawn counts of 9 Ruff, 16 Redshank, 1 Curlew, 700 Wigeon and 5 Greylag but many more birds during the day.

Holden Tower

The Peregrine Falcon pair and at least three Cranes were viewable.

A variety of duck on the Long Ground Pool with 21 male and 9 female Pochard present.

South Lake

Three Black-tailed Godwit, 7 Snipe, c40 Dunlin among the Lapwing flock. 40+ Shoveler and now 7 Wigeon on the wader scrape/duck marsh. Two Little Egret roosted in the trees on the deep lake, good to hear of them using branches we pruned as suitable perches in an attempt to attract them and Kingfishers.

Kingfisher Hide

5+ Ruff, 180 Dunlin and 80+ Golden Plover among the Lapwing on the Bottom New Piece.

143 E. White-fronted Geese on the Four Score field ( S of hide) with 4 Bewick’s Swans.

Two Reed Bunting in the reeds

Zeiss Hide

700+ Wigeon, 240 Teal and a few Pochard on the deeper fleet and floods. Snipe roosting among the loafing Teal on the rush islands. An adult Caspian Gull was reported here today.

South Finger Filtration beds viewing Screen

Snipe, 4 Shoveler and 15 Tufted Duck on the pond.

 

 

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Wigeon grazing thanks to summer sheep https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-arundel-sightings/wigeon-grazing-thanks-to-summer-sheep/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-arundel-sightings/wigeon-grazing-thanks-to-summer-sheep/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 16:22:09 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85610

Male wigeon

On Sunday afternoon I counted 11 wigeon across from the Ramsar hide. Four were up on the cut, grazing on the fresh grass. Droppings from the Jacob’s sheep we had grazing this wet meadow last summer have added nutrients to the soil bringing up more grass to feed grazing ducks and geese. It’s great to see more grass growth adding to the sedge and reeds in the area.  The increase in the number of wigeon and the fact they are grazing indicates our habitat management is working. We will be trialling cattle grazing on the wet meadow this summer.  The cattle should be able to eat some of the tougher plants the sheep were avoiding.

 

Recent sightings by WWT wardens.

Tues Jan 8

Arun Riverlife Lagoon: 6 pochard, 2 tufted ducks, grey heron, 1 kingfisher, 11 teal.

Scrape hide: 16 teal, 1 little grebe, 2 gadwall, 7 shoveler, 2 shelducks, water rail.

Sand Martin hide: 15 shelducks, 5 lapwings, 1 grey heron, 5 shoveler, 4 teal, 5 gadwall, 5 wigeon, 3 pochard, 1 little grebe, 1 tufted duck.

Ramsar hide: 5 cormorants, 3 teal, 3 lapwing, and 14 snipe.

Wed 9 Jan

Sand Martin /Ramsar hides: 3 cormorants, 3 lapwing, 15 teal, 1 grey heron, 3 gadwall, 1 little egeret, 3 kingfisher, 16 shelduck, 6 shoveler, 1 snipe.

Scrape hide: 13 teal, 12 shoveler. 2 shelduck, 2 gadwall, 1 little grebe, 1 kingfisher.

Offham hangaer: 3 buzzards.

Reedbed hide: bullfinches.

Woodland Lodge hide: water rail.

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 5 tufted duck, 6 pochard, 2 teal.

Thurs 10 Jan

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 5 pochard, 2 tufted ducks, 1 cormorant, 2 gadwall.

Scrape hide: 21 teal, 10 shoveler, 2 shelduck.

Sand Martin hide: 4 gadwall, 18 teal, 3 mandarin, 6 lapwing, 21 shelduck, and kingfisher.

Ramsar hide: grey heron, little egret, 1 cormorant, 12 teal, 2 lapwing, 7 snipe.

Fri 11 Jan

Ramsar /Sand Martin hides: 4 wigeoon, 10 snipe, 3 cormorants, 2 grey herons, 12 teal, 4 pochard, 16 shelducks, 1 pintail, 4 tufted ducks, 2 lapwing, 1 little grebe. 1 little egret, 4 tufted ducks.

Lapwing hide: 1 shoveler.

Scrape hide: 1 water rail, 23 teal, 1 little grebe, 4 snipe, 6 shoveler, 1 shelduck.

Arun Roverlife lagoon: 10 tufted ducks, 11 pochard, 6 teal.

Sat 12 Jan

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 16 pochards, 2 gadwall, 12 tufted ducks

Reedswamp area: 1 water rail.

Scrape hide: 1 water rail, 8 shoveler, 18 teal, 5 gadwal. 2 shelduck.

Sand Martin hide: 16 shelduck, 7 gadwall, 1 grey heron, 3 shoveler, 1 lapwing, 1 kingfisher.

Ramsar hide: 4 cormorants, 1 tufted duck, 10 snipe.

Offham hangar: 1 buzzard.

Lapwing hide: 1 teal, 1 cormorant.

Sun 13 Jan

Ramsar hide: 11 wigeon, 4 lapwing, 17 snipe, 4 pochard.

Lapwing hide: 5 bullfinches, 7 siskin.

Scrape hide: 27 teal, 10 shoveler, 6 snipe.

Arun Riverlife: 11 pochard.

 

 

 

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Raptor-fest https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/raptor-fest-4/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/raptor-fest-4/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 13:47:02 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85601 Continuing this winters run of good raptor days with at least 4 Marsh Harrier, Peregrine, 3+ Buzzard, 3 Kestrel, 2 Sparrowhawk and Merlin over the weekend.

At least 3 Barn Owl (two showing well from the Ron Barker Hide) and 2 Tawny Owl today again.

Fifteen species of swan, geese and duck present with upwards of 10,000 birds visiting the reserve; Mute Swan, Whooper Swan(700+), Pink-footed Geese, Greylag, Canada, Shelduck, Mallard, Teal(1000+), Wigeon(800+), Gadwall(2), Pintail (200+), Shoveler(~10), Pochard(50+), Tufted(50+) and Goldeneye(3).

Brief light shower on Monday. The weather looks set to turn colder from Wednesday onward, we love a frosty reserve!

A few more waders turning up with 4 Redshank, Oystercatcher, 800+ Lapwing, 60+ Ruff, 10+ Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Snipe(s).

Some small flocks of Fieldfare seen over the weekend. Mistle Thrushes are regularly on the over flow car park and in trees near the in focus shop. two or three pairs of Stonechat out on the reserve.

Treecreeper from the Janet Kear Hide and Kingfisher from the United Utilities Hide today.

At the feeding stations along nature trail you can expect Tree Sparrow, Reed Bunting, Goldfinch, Greenfinch, Chaffinch, Blue Tit, Great Tit, Coal Tit, Long-tailed Tit, Great-spotted Woodpecker and the possibility of Siskin, Redpoll and Brambling. Goldcrest are present sometimes following the Long-tailed Tit flock.

Check out a few days of the previous sighting to get a fuller picture as to what can be seen on the reserve.

It should be possible to see over 60 species in a full days bird watching at Martin Mere. If you would like to know the best spots, up to date info or to report any sightings then please call in at the in focus shop next to the Discovery Hide.

 

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Recent Sightings – 14th January 2019 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-14th-january-2019/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-14th-january-2019/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 11:31:55 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85597 Count taken at low tide this morning.

A really nice treat this morning was to get close views of Curlew from the Brent hide, both on the estuary and on our wadermarsh. At low tide curlews use their curved beaks to dig into the mud looking for deep lying worms and other invertebrates. Wintering curlews are extremely common sight on Strangford Lough, sometimes seem in very large numbers, but it was really lovely to see one on the wadermarsh this morning. They are only infrequent visitors onto our wadermarsh. This could be an indicator that it’s getting better for the invertebrates in the mud, seeing a curlew forage here. Hopefully it returns to give delightfully close views in the future.

Despite being a common sight on the lough throughout the year, there are one of the most threatened birds in the British isles, as their breeding population has crashed by half in the last 20 years. In fact it’s doing even worse as a breeding bird in Ireland, we lost “96 per cent since the 1980s”.

To learn more about the Curlew’s plight, what WWT are doing to combat their decline and to learn about our Curlew appeal, find more information through the following link:

Curlews in crisis – now one of Britain’s most endangered birds

 

 

Curlew, note the long curved bill.

Estuary – visible from the Brent Hide and the Limekiln Observatory

Brent Goose 68, Shelduck 151, Oystercatcher 5, Redshank 25, Black-headed Gull 27, Little Egret 1, Curlew 11, Black-tailed Godwit 1

Main lake – visible from Sensory garden and Visitor centre

Mallard 232, Tufted Duck 31, Shoveler 8, Gadwall 2, Teal 33, Moorhen 3, Coot 4

Shingle bank – visible from Sensory garden, Wadermarsh and Visitor Centre

Mallard 23, Teal 22, Cormorant 2, Moorhen 3, Gadwall 5, Tufted Duck 1, Black-headed gull 14

Wadermarsh – visible from Wadermarsh lookout and Brent Hide

Moorhen 12, Oystercatcher 2, Curlew 1

Freshwater Lagoon – visible from Brent Hide and Crannóg

Mallard 17, Moorhen 2, Coot 2, Tufted Duck 1

Saline Lagoon – visible from Limekiln observatory

Little Grebe 3, Little Egret 1

Limestone Lake

Mallard 5, Tufted Duck 2

Peninsula Field and Saltmarsh

Jackdaw

Brickworks

Jackdaw 2

Woodland

Blackbird, Wren, Dunnock, Wood pigeon, Jay, Robin, Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, Long-tailed Tit, Chaffinch, Bullfinch, Goldfinch, Goldcrest,

]]> https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-14th-january-2019/feed/ 0 Wildlife sightings – 14/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-14-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-14-01-19/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 11:15:03 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85595 a.m. Tide Level: High 

Wader Lake

Grey heron 4

Redshank 2

Shoveler 2

Cormorant 1

Snipe 1

Shelduck 2

Teal 2

Herring gull 1

Black-headed gull 1

Lapwing 48

Stock dove 46

Saline Lagoon

Curlew 1

Shelduck 2

Hawthorn Wood

Mealy redpoll 1

Greenfinch 2

Bullfinch 9

Coal tit 4

Chaffinch 19

Lesser redpoll 6

Great-spotted woodpecker 3

Nuthatch 2

Reed bunting 1

Other birds

Sparrowhawk – 1 – Play area

Long-tailed tit – 6 – Gully

Tree sparrow – 6 – Centre feeders

Brambling – 1 – Centre Feeders

Stock dove – 1 – East Downs

Great spotted woodpecker – 1 – East Downs

Jay – 2 – Wader Lake footpath

Goldeneye – 1 – River Wear

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Today’s Sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2503/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2503/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 10:24:23 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85592

Whooper swans Mute swans White fronted geese x8 Pink footed geese x 80 Tundra bean geese x 3 Ring necked duck Cattle egret x 2 Barn owl Short eared owl x 2 Great white egret x 2 Little egret Marsh harrier Sparrowhawk Kestrel Buzzard Shelduck Shoveler Pintail Tufted duck Wigeon Teal Goldeneye Gadwall Redshank Common […]]]>

Whooper swans
Mute swans
White fronted geese x8
Pink footed geese x 80
Tundra bean geese x 3
Ring necked duck
Cattle egret x 2
Barn owl
Short eared owl x 2
Great white egret x 2
Little egret
Marsh harrier
Sparrowhawk
Kestrel
Buzzard
Shelduck
Shoveler
Pintail
Tufted duck
Wigeon
Teal
Goldeneye
Gadwall
Redshank
Common snipe
Golden plover
Lapwing
Dunlin
Black-tailed godwit
Cormorant
Curlew
Moorhen
Coot
Fieldfare
Stonechat
Tree sparrow
Reed bunting

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2 Bitterns at rest in the main lake reeds https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/2-bitterns-at-rest-in-the-main-lake-reeds/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/2-bitterns-at-rest-in-the-main-lake-reeds/#respond Mon, 14 Jan 2019 09:57:13 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85584  

1 Iceland Gull 3rd cyr – main lake

2 Bittern – main lake (N+SE shores)

1 Shelduck – main lake

4 Mistle Thrush – O.C.P

1 Water Pipit – marsh (southern bund)

5 Meadow Pipit – flew NW

1 Chiffchaff – wildside

1 Little Owl – flew from the entrance area into West route

1 Peregrine – over main lake

 

January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Bittern, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Kestrel, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Water Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Sunday sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/sunday-sightings-10/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/sunday-sightings-10/#respond Sun, 13 Jan 2019 18:08:42 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85581 Martin Smith Hide

The Jack Snipe is still proving very popular and showing on and off from the Martin Smith Hide, also 4+ Common Snipe, Water Rail and a Cetti’s Warlber here and two Chiffchaff this morning. The JS has been favouring the eastern (right hand) cut sedge/rush island.

Willow Hide

Two Water Rail seen here today.

Knott Hide

180 Wigeon on the pool.

Holden Tower

At least three Cranes plus two Peregrine and the Barnacle and Canada Geese. 25+ Linnet roaming the salt pasture and saltmarsh.

Tack Piece

Got busier through the day with flocks of Wigeon, Starling, Greylag, Golden Plover, Lapwing, Redshank and at least 9 Ruff, 200+ Dunlin and 20 Curlew. Many of the Bewick’s Swans fed here during the day. 5 E. White-fronted Geese were among the Greylags.

Rushy Hide

98 Bewick’s Swans (+2 on Tack Piece), 100+ Pintail and 125 Pochard (24 females).

South Lake

Great Crested Grebe, 45 Shoveler, 80 Teal, 14 Cormorant, 22 Black-tailed Godwit, 540 Lapwing, 2 Dunlin and a Snipe. A single Bewick’s Swan was resting here. 40+ Herring, 2 Lesser Black-backed, single Common and 250 Black-headed Gulls.

Zeiss Hide

70 Golden Plover, 300+ Wigeon, 200+ Teal and 300+ Lapwing early morning.

Kingfisher Hide

The E.White-fronted Goose flock was in the field to the south of the hide today, a Peregrine was seen mobbing a Buzzard.

Grounds

Chiffchaff by the Otter enclosure with a Treecreeper and Goldcrests.

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Today’s Highlights https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-545/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-545/#respond Sun, 13 Jan 2019 17:43:08 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85579

Cattle egret and sheep by Steve Ball

Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag geese
Canada geese
Shelduck
Pochard
Wigeon
Pintail
Teal
Mallard
Ring-necked duck
Tufted duck
Ringed teal (escapee)
Shoveler
Moorhen
Coot
Black-tailed godwit
Lapwing
Golden plover
Cormorant
Little egret
Great white egret
Cattle egret x 2
Redshank
Snipe
Marsh harrier
Kestrel
Peregrine
Merlin
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Reed bunting
Linnet
Stonechat
Pied wagtail
Starling
Brown hares
Roe deer

]]> https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-545/feed/ 0 Black-tailed Godwit on the wader scrape https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/black-tailed-godwit-on-the-wader-scrape/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/black-tailed-godwit-on-the-wader-scrape/#respond Sun, 13 Jan 2019 10:41:16 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85573

 

1 Black-tailed Godwit – wader scrape

1 Jack Snipe – wader scrape p.m.

1 Yellow-legged Gull – main lake

1 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

2 Pintail – reservoir lagoon

1 Shelduck – main lake

6 Fieldfare – South route

1 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

2 Peregrine – perched on hospital. Also seen stooping on a Crow over the sheltered lagoon

4 Mistle Thrush – overflow car park

 

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2502/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2502/#respond Sat, 12 Jan 2019 14:49:02 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85566 Bewick’s swans
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada goose
White-fronted goose x 8
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal (escapee)
Pochard
Tufted duck
Ring-necked duck
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
Water rail
Great egret
Cattle egret x 2
Little egret
Curlew
Black-tailed godwit
Redshank
Lapwing
Golden plover
Herring gull
Lesser black-backed gull
Black-headed gull
Starling
Meadow pipit
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Dunnock
Goldfinch
Chaffinch
Long-tailed tit
Wren
Fieldfare
Blackbird
Stonechat
Pheasant
Magpie
Rook
Carrion crow
Kestrel
Marsh harrier
Buzzard
Barn owl

Mammals
Roe deer x 5

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Jack Snipe and Water Rails https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/jack-snipe-and-water-rails/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/jack-snipe-and-water-rails/#respond Sat, 12 Jan 2019 11:37:04 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85564 Rushy

Bewick’s Swan 108
Pintail 120
Pochard 110
Teal 300
Lapwing 400
Redshank 1
Dunlin 3
Snipe 7

Robbie Garnett

Snipe 1
Jack Snipe 1 showing well (09.00)
Great close up views of Pintail, Wigeon and Teal.

Tack Piece

 

Whitefronted Goose 10 Close views from Stephen Kirk hide.
Wigeon 920
Teal 230
Pintail 21
Shoveler 12
Lapwing 370
Golden Plover 130 Flying over.
Ruff 14
Redshank 14

Holden Tower

Whitefronted Goose flock (139) landed on the estuary.
Barnacle Goose 240
Canada Goose 230
Crane 2
Wigeon 90 very close to hide.
Peregrine 2

South Lake

Teal 260
Shoveler 63
Lapwing 400
Ruff 2
Dunlin 6
Black Tailed Godwit 21
Oystercatcher 1
Cormorant 12
Great Crested Grebe 1

Zeiss Hide

Wigeon 1000
Teal 355
Lapwing 469
Dunlin 26
Black Tailed Godwit 1
Snipe 4

 

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Latest Sightings – Saturday 12th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-saturday-12th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-saturday-12th-january/#respond Sat, 12 Jan 2019 10:44:23 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85562 Opening times:
10am – 5pm every day except Christmas Day

No sign of the Green-winged Teal yet this morning, but it could still be around. Not as many Teal on the Folly Pond first thing, so it could have moved to the Flood Ground or Teal Pond.

A large flock of Lapwing and Starlings are moving between fields around the Avenue Tower and the Corner Field. Plenty of Barnacle Geese in the fields as well.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai
ZFJ – Beryl

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 126 (including 20 cygnets)
Mute Swan 60 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 30
Mallard 190
Tufted Duck 30
Greater Scaup 2 (one is a suspected hybrid)
Teal 11
Wigeon 170
Moorhen 7
Oystercatcher 2

Folly Pond
Teal 50
Wigeon 200
Shoveler 25
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 5
Black-tailed Godwit 19

Teal Pond
Mallard 7
Moorhen 1

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

joe.bilous@wwt.org.uk

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Pintail & Bittern on our main lake https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/85558/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/85558/#respond Sat, 12 Jan 2019 10:16:27 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85558

Kestrel hunting off the Nature Trail (Tom McKibbin)

1 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

3 Snipe – wader scrape

6 Pintail – main lake, grazing marsh

1 Yellow Legged Gull – main lake

11 Fieldfare – entrance area

1 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

1 Kestrel – South route

1 Peregrine – perched on hospital

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

]]> https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/85558/feed/ 0 Wildlife sightings – 11/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-11-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-11-01-19/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:52:33 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85552 Wader Lake (AM, high tide):

Grey heron 5 (in heron hedge)

Shelduck

Teal

Shoveler

Curlew

Common snipe

Black-headed gull

Kestrel 1 (in heron hedge)

 

Saline lagoon (AM, high tide):

Curlew 60

Shelduck 4

Teal 8

 

Hawthorn Wood feeding station:

Brambling 6

Chaffinch 26

Goldfinch 4

Greenfinch 6

Bullfinch 22

Siskin 1

Lesser redpoll 6

Mealy redpoll 2

Willow tit 2

Great-spotted woodpecker 3

Nuthatch 2

Treecreeper 1

 

Plus:

Cormorant on the river 2

Canada goose on the river 1

Redshank on the river 9

Tree sparrow on the centre feeders 16

Jay on Wader Lake footpath 2

Tufted duck at the reservoir 42

Shelduck at the reservoir 8

Common frog at the amphibian pond

Hazel catkins across site

Snowdrops emerging across site

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2501/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2501/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 15:42:56 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85550 Bewick’s swan
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada goose
White-fronted goose x 8
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal (escapee)
Pochard
Tufted duck
Coot
Moorhen
Water rail
Little egret
Black-tailed godwit
Redshank
Snipe
Lapwing
Starling
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
Goldfinch
Great tit
Blue tit
Stonechat
Stock dove
Sparrowhawk
Kestrel
Hen harrier (ring-tail)
Marsh harrier
Buzzard
Short-eared owl

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Recent sightings 8th – 11th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-8th-11th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-8th-11th-january/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 14:44:19 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85548

Redwing Cr Russ Myners

British Steel Hide

Recent sightings from the steel hide include,230 Black-tailed Godwit, 60 Lapwing, 70 Wigeon, as well as small groups of Redshank, Greenshank and Dunlin. Great White Egret was spotted on Wednesday. Our resident Spoonbill continues to make regular appearances between the Steel hide and Herons Wing hide. Out on the estuary, 472 Shelduck have been seen as well as Great Crested Grebe.

Millennium Wetlands

Seen over the wetlands have been, 50 Gadwall, 39 Teal, 30 Tufted Duck and 18 Shoveler. There have also been sightings of small groups of Pochard, Water Rail and Little Grebe. Sparrowhawk, Goshawk and Red Kite have been seen over the Deep Water Lake. 15 Redwing have been seen on the walk from the Center towards the Herons Wing Hide. Groups of Long-tailed Tits, Goldfinches and Bullfinches have been seen along the Northern Loop of the reserve. We continue to get regular sightings of the Otter from both  the Herons wing hide and the new screens, most often between 10am and 1pm.

]]> https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-8th-11th-january/feed/ 0 Latest Sightings – Friday 11th January – Green-winged Teal is back https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-friday-11th-january-green-winged-teal-is-back/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-friday-11th-january-green-winged-teal-is-back/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 12:31:03 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85546 Opening times:
10am – 5pm every day except Christmas Day

The drake Green-winged Teal has reappeared on the Folly Pond today, currently best viewed from Sharp’s Lookout.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 148 (including 26 cygnets)
Mute Swan 60 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 30
Mallard 190
Tufted Duck 30
Greater Scaup 2 (one is a suspected hybrid)
Teal 11
Wigeon 170
Moorhen 7
Oystercatcher 2

Folly Pond
Teal 470
Wigeon 125
Shoveler 25
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4

Teal Pond
Mallard 7
Moorhen 1
Barnacle Geese 31

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

joe.bilous@wwt.org.uk

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Great Views of Whitefronted Geese https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/great-views-of-whitefronted-geese/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/great-views-of-whitefronted-geese/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 11:01:20 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85544 South Lake Hide

Good flock of 640 Lapwings with 4 Ruff, 20 Dunlin and 2 Black Tailed Godwit among them. A couple of snipe around the edges  and 240 Teal. Only a handful of Pochard and Tufted Duck this morning but 6 Cormorant and a Great Crested Grebe. The large gathering of Shoveler have dropped to just 54 today.

Rushy

108 Bewick’s Swan roosted overnight and have started moving into the Tack Piece and the four score field near the Kingfisher Hide. The usual mass of Pochard, Pintail and Tufted Duck. There were single Redshank, Dunlin and Grey Wagtail and at least 8 snipe along the left hand edge.

Holden Tower and Walkway

Around 100 Lapwing on the Tack Piece with 30 dunlin and 2 Ruff among them, at least 500 Wigeon here with a further 550 on the Dumbles scrape. Only a single Snipe at the Martin Smith but keep checking the Jack Snipe showed well here all day yesterday. Two Water rail at the Willow Hide and Peregrine, Buzzard and Raven on the Dumbles.

Zeiss and South Finger

Great close up views of 144 Whitefronted Geese from the Kingfisher hide. Very mobile Lapwing (750), Dunlin (43) and Golden Plover (10) especially when buzzed by a Peregrine. There were 720 Wigeon  and 350 Teal on the scrape and a Cettis was singing close to the hide

Grounds

A Treecreeper, 3 Goldcrest, lots of Tits and 2 Chiffchaff were around the Otter pen but no sign of the Yellow Browed warbler.

 

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Duck Duck Pipit?? https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/duck-duck-pipit/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/duck-duck-pipit/#respond Fri, 11 Jan 2019 10:30:46 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85541

5 Pintail – main lake

1 Goldeneye – sheltered lagoon

1 Shelduck – main lake

1 Water Pipit – wader scrape

2 Siskin – sheltered lagoon

2 Peregrine – perched on hospital ledge

1 Iceland Gull – main lake

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Water Pipit feeding close to the Wildside Hide https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/water-pipit-feeding-close-to-the-wildside-hide/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/water-pipit-feeding-close-to-the-wildside-hide/#respond Thu, 10 Jan 2019 15:28:24 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85536

Water Pipit by Naomi Landy

1 Caspian Gull 2nd winter – reservoir lagoon

1 Jack Snipe – scrape

1 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

1 Water Pipit – marsh

1 Shelduck – main lake

1 Kestrel (female) – sheltered lagoon

 

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Caspian Gull, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2500/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2500/#respond Thu, 10 Jan 2019 12:33:41 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85532 Whooper swan
Bewick’s swan
Mute swan
Bean goose
Canada goose
Greylag goose
White fronted goose
Pink footed goose
Pochard
Pintail
Shelduck
Wigeon
Mallard
Teal
Ringed teal (escapee)
Gadwall
Coot
Moorhen
Little egret
Cattle egret x2
Snipe
Dunlin
Redshank
Lapwing
Black tailed godwit
Stonechat
Cetti’s warbler
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Reed bunting
Wren
Great tit
Blue tit
Fieldfare
Starling
Short-eared owl
Buzzard

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Wildlife sightings – 10/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-10-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-10-01-19/#respond Thu, 10 Jan 2019 09:45:20 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85529 a.m. Tide Level: Mid

Wader Lake

Shelduck 4

Shoveler 2

Teal 10

Black-headed gull 175

Grey heron 3

Snipe 3

Herring gull 1

Saline Lagoon

Shelduck 2

Teal 3

Hawthorn Wood

Nuthatch 1

Great spotted woodpecker 2

Great tit 7

Blue tit 9

Willow tit 1

Coal tit 3

Dunnock 3

Brambling 1

Goldfinch 1

Chaffinch 9

Bulfinch 3

Other birds

Long-tailed tit – 8 – Insect garden

Goldeneye – 1 – River Wear

Cormorant – 1 – River Wear

Canada goose – 1 – River Wear

Tufted duck – 37 – Reservoir

Curlew – 2 – River Wear

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Chilly again https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/chilly-again/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/chilly-again/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 19:50:41 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85526 A colder than expected start to the morning with some ice here and there.  A total of 104 Bewick’s Swans were on the Rushy this morning.

South Lake

10 Black-tailed Godwit, 500+ Lapwing, Great Crested Grebe, 64 Shelduck, 2 Gadwall, 22 Pochard, 36 Shoveler, 123 Teal.
.

Zeiss Hide

164 Dunlin, 250+ Golden Plover, 178 Teal, 350+ Wigeon, Cetti’s Warbler.
.

Kingfisher Hide

White-fronted Goose flock now up to 141 birds, also 3 Bewick’s Swans in Four Score. In Bottom New Piece 51 Dunlin, 163 Lapwing, 88 Golden Plover, Buzzard.
.

Martin Smith Hide

Jack Snipe showing again with 5 Common Snipe.
.

Willow Hide

2 Water Rail under feeders this morning

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Lesser snow goose https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-duck-diary/lesser-snow-goose/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-duck-diary/lesser-snow-goose/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 15:44:46 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85515

The lesser snow goose is fascinating because they exhibit two colour types; ‘blue’ and ‘white’. The dark colour of a ‘blue’ goose is controlled by a single gene, with ‘blue’ being partially dominant over the ‘white’. The breeding of an adult ‘blue’ with an adult ‘white’ can result in a combination of both ‘blue’ or […]]]>

The lesser snow goose is fascinating because they exhibit two colour types; ‘blue’ and ‘white’.

The dark colour of a ‘blue’ goose is controlled by a single gene, with ‘blue’ being partially dominant over the ‘white’. The breeding of an adult ‘blue’ with an adult ‘white’ can result in a combination of both ‘blue’ or ‘white’ goslings! Blue birds with white splotches often originate from combined parentage.

Blue and white coloured chicks

The colours are identifiable from the moment the goslings hatch, with the ‘blue’ type showing grey and the ‘white’ showing yellow. Can you guess how many goslings of both blue and white morphs are within this adorable huddle above?

Goslings walk miles in their first month

Flocks nest incredibly close together, with some birds acting as a lookout. Snow geese are extraordinarily brave when protecting both the nest and young, but predictably, dominant pairs get a nest towards the centre of the flock. Once hatched, after a few days, goslings should expect to walk anything up to 50 miles in their first month of life. The males grow faster than the females, and thus can often be sexed easily by looking at the differences in body size.

Smiling geese

Due to the sheer volume of food needed to sustain a growing goose, birds defecate from anything up to 6-12 times an hour, shedding the indigestible roughage. Snow geese are capable of harnessing the nutrients of plant roots thanks to the heavy serrations on their bill. The black trim around the bill is known as the ‘grinning patch’ as the bird looks like it is smiling!

After just 70 days, these incredible birds are already ready to fly back south. Their first feathers are plain and simple, identifying them immediately as juveniles but enabling them to make their migration as soon as possible.

Breeding grounds in the Arctic

Birds migrate to their breeding grounds in the Arctic when snow is still on the ground, and use their body fat to wait for the new grass shoots to grow. Once they have gorged on the new grass, females sit down to incubate, eating very little during the following 26-28 days and predominantly living off their fat reserves.

Most snow geese used to migrate south again in a non stop wave, but nowadays the species can use multiple staging grounds to make their way down to their wintering areas around Washington and ending up in the gulf of Mexico. During this epic journey they have developed a taste for peas, corn and other crops, which bring them closer than ever to human habitation. With that much poo on the ground combined with crop destruction, they have developed quite a negative reputation in some areas…

Dramatic population recovery

Snow Goose hunting in the eastern United States was stopped in 1916 because of low population levels. Hunting was allowed again in 1975 after populations had recovered. Since then, their populations have continued to grow, to the point that some areas of tundra nesting habitat are starting to suffer from overgrazing.

Come and see our snow geese at Slimbridge in our Geese of the World zone.

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1078 Whooper Swan https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/1078-whooper-swan/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/1078-whooper-swan/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 15:27:51 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85508 A lovely frosty start to the day and this winter’s highest count of Whooper Swan with 1078 birds present on the reserve this morning. Fairly static counts of roosting Pink-footed Geese with 5439 also present. Locally 4 European White-fronted Geese have been seen so keep your eyes peeled!

More good raptor days with up to 2 Merlin, 2 Peregrine, 2+ Marsh Harrier, 3+ Buzzard, 2 Kestrel and 2 Sparrowhawk. On Monday a probable Hen Harrier was seen very distantly heading towards the coast.

Merlin on the lookout from the Ron Barker Hide (Mark Woodhead)

At least 2 Barn Owl out and about throughout the day and Tawny Owl seen roosting.

The first Oystercatcher of the year was seen on Monday. At least 700 Lapwing, 60+ Ruff, up to 70 Black-tailed Godwit, double figure Snipe and a Dunlin.

Lapwing flushed by Peregrine.

Kingfisher seen today. At least 4 Stonechat present, 60+ Stock Dove, 2 Little Egret.

Frosty mornings are the best!

Check out a few days of the previous sighting to get a fuller picture as to what can be seen on the reserve.

It should be possible to see over 60 species in a full days bird watching at Martin Mere. If you would like to know the best spots, up to date info or to report any sightings then please call in at the in focus shop next to the Discovery Hide.

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Sightings for Wednesday 9th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-wednesday-9th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-wednesday-9th-january/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 12:42:05 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85506 Bright but windy day again here at Welney, all hides are open or you may want to keep warm in our heated main Observatory whered the Ringed-necked duck is showing well again.

Sightings so far today:

Bewick’s swan
Black swan
Mute swan
Whooper swan
Bean goose
Canada goose
Greylag goose
Pink-footed goose
White-fronted goose
Gadwall
Mallard
Pintail
Pochard
Ringed-necked duck
Shelduck
Shoveler
Teal
Tufted duck
Wigeon
Great egret
Moorhen
Coot
Black-tailed godwit
Dunlin
Lapwing
Redshank
Snipe
Blackbird
Blue tit
Goldfinch
Linnet
Tree sparrow
Wren
Black-headed Gull
Great black-backed gull
Kestrel
Marsh harrier

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Latest Sightings – Wednesday 9th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-wednesday-9th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-wednesday-9th-january/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 10:34:20 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85502 Opening times:
10am – 5pm every day except Christmas Day

A frosty and sunny start to the day, with plenty of geese in the fields.

The swans are doing their best to break the ice in the Whooper Pond which the ducks seem grateful for!

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 154 (including 17 cygnets)
Mute Swan 62 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose11
Mallard 198
Tufted Duck 29
Greater Scaup 1
Teal 11
Wigeon 178
Moorhen 7
Oystercatcher 2

Folly Pond
Teal 470
Wigeon 125
Shoveler 25
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4

Teal Pond
Mallard 7
Moorhen 1
Barnacle Geese 31

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

joe.bilous@wwt.org.uk

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Peregrine, Pipit and Pintail https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/peregrine-pipit-and-pintail/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/peregrine-pipit-and-pintail/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 10:20:59 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85503

Photo by Rob Werran

 

2 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

6 Pintail – main lake, reservoir lagoon, sheltered lagoon

1 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

1 Shelduck – main lake

2 Peregrine – perched on hospital ledge

1 Siskin – South route

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

 

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Recent sightings 5th – 8th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-5th-8th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-5th-8th-january/#respond Wed, 09 Jan 2019 09:35:07 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85480

Black-tailed Godwit WWT stock image

British Steel Hide

Recent sightings from the steel hide have been, 138 Black-tailed Godwit, 69 Lapwing, 107 Wigeon as well as groups of Redshank, Shelduck and a Buzzard. Out on the estuary, 430 Shelduck, Pintail number in the hundreds as well as Great Crested Grebe. Curlew can be seen making use of the ditches out on the saltmarsh for feeding. Our resident Spoonbill continues to make regular appearances. A Green Sandpiper has been spotted on the Dafen Scrapes.

 

Millennium Wetlands

58 Gadwall, 50 Tufted Duck and 20 Teal have been seen over the wetlands recently. Small groups of Pochard and Shoveler as well as a single male Pintail can be seen from the Herons Wing Hide. Groups of Black-tailed Godwit and Lapwing continue to use the western scrapes for feeding. Great Spotted Woodpeckers and Jays make good use of the feeders by the hides. Long-tailed Tits have been seen around Black poplar wood. Regular sightings of the Otter from the Hides around Deep Water Lake, with almost daily occurances.

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Caring for flamingos the world over https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-flamingo-diary/caring-for-flamingos-the-world-over/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-flamingo-diary/caring-for-flamingos-the-world-over/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2019 21:14:08 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85488 Happy New Year flamingo followers. And welcome to the first edition of the WWT Flamingo Diary for 2019. I am going to start off the new year with some exciting news. You may be aware that WWT is the home of the Flamingo Specialist Group, an organisation that sits within the folds of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN): https://www.iucn.org/

The Flamingo Specialist Group (FSG) has a membership that is global and covers the work of flamingo experts working with captive and wild birds. And as the co-chair of this Specialised Group, it’s been great for me to be involved in the relaunch of the FSG’s journal at the end of 2018.

If you’re interested in current news from the field, wherever flamingos may be in the world then you can read all of the articles in Flamingo (original name, I know) for free at the FSG’s website: http://www.flamingo-sg.org/journal/flamingo-2018/

All six species of flamingo are covered in the articles contained within. It’s wonderful to see the breadth of scientific research and study that is taking place on flamingos, in all different populations.

WWT’s own flamingo contribute a great deal of information to our understanding of flamingo biology and management. The birds you can see at Slimbridge, Martin Mere, Llanelli and Washington Wetland Centres are not just for show. They help us learn more about how flamingos “work” and what they need to survive. They are amazing ambassadors for their wild counterparts.

The Slimbridge foster chicks at Christmas 2018. Time for a seasonal paddle?!

This year brings new projects to WWT’s bird collections, which add extra value to these flamingos and to those in other parts of the world. As ever, I’ll be posting entries on this flamingo science over the course of 2019. But a few sneak peaks for you… we’ll be investigating the lives of the foster-reared Chilean flamingos in more detail. We’ll continue with the nocturnal trends (assessing what we know about how lesser flamingos behave at night). And I’ll be looking into the relationships and friendships between birds in some more details too. This long-running “flamingo friends” project is helping us piece together the reasons behind flamingo social behaviour, and what it means for how we manage our flocks of flamingos in zoological collections. It’s important that we continue to research our flamingos in human care for we can then better maintain sustainable populations of these birds into the future. And these sustainable populations help to tell the story of their wild cousins- which is probably the most important job for our collection birds to do.

The rarest flamingo. We take great pride in our WWT Andean flamingos, and they tell the vitally important story of their wild cousins whose future hasn’t always been so rosy.

Four of the six flamingo species are of conservation concern. You can find out more about their plight on the Red List of the IUCN: https://www.iucnredlist.org/ and searching for each species of flamingo in turn. Classifying a species on the Red List is the standard way of determining how well it is doing in the wild. Is the population OK? Or does it need help to prevent extinction? WWT are experts at preventing extinction- you’ve all met a friendly Hawaiian goose (nene) on your visits to one of our centres right?! Raising awareness of the threats to flamingos means we can keep them safe too.

The Andean flamingo is categorised as Vulnerable- the most serious threat level of all flamingo species. Currently the wild population has stabilised; let’s hope it now starts to grow. James’, lesser and Chilean flamingos are all said to be “Near Threatened”- meaning that without management, monitoring and research their populations could fall to critical levels in the near future.

The future of flamingos. A Chilean flamingo chick of the class of 2018. Hopefully to grow up and produce its own chicks in a few years from now.

Therefore it’s great news that the FSG’s journal is available once again as a way of sharing vital information on flamingo population sizes, habitats and breeding success. And to show how we can best manage their wetland homes to keep them safe and secure for these amazing birds. So go on, treat yourself to a free publication all about everyone’s favourite pink birds 🙂

http://www.flamingo-sg.org/journal/

 

 

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Tuesday sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/tuesday-sightings-3/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/tuesday-sightings-3/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2019 16:44:45 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85479 Starlings- mini-murmuration this evening

Yellow-browed Warbler update

The YBW was still present this morning, showing well and at times calling. It was very active and mobile and actively chasing or being chased by Chiffchaff and Goldcrest. It commuted between the Otter Enclosure trees to the shrubs and birches next to the Flamingo House. Unfortunately at mid-morning a number of gathered birders/photographers witnessed it flying into a window where it subsequently ended up under the boardwalk. A member of mammal HQ staff drained the pond down and searched the area where the bird was last seen but found nothing. We have had unconfirmed reports of it being seen later in the day, staff will search for it again tomorrow.

Rushy Hide

100+ Bewick’s Swan

Martin Smith Hide

Jack and 5 Common Snipe

Tack Piece

Busier later in the day with 25 Ruff, 15 Black-tailed Godwit, 30 Snipe, 300 Dunlin and 6 Redshank

Holden Tower

Two Peregrine Falcons and a few Cranes feeding along with Canada Geese today.

Zeiss Hide

200 Golden Plover, 70 Dunlin, 4 Snipe, 28 Great Black-backed Gull over high tide.

South Lake

26 Black-tailed Godwit, 2 Dunlin 5 Wigeon, 90 Teal, 7 Snipe on the wader scrape this morning.

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Sightings for Tuesday 8th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-tuesday-8th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-tuesday-8th-january/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2019 13:44:17 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85468 Bright but windy day here at Welney, all hides and footpaths remain open.

Ring-necked duck is still in front of Main Observatory.

Sightings so far today:

Mute swan
Whooper swan
Barnacle goose
Bean goose
Canada goose
Greylag goose
Pink-footed goose
White-fronted goose
Mallard
Pintail
Pochard
Ring-necked duck
Shelduck
Shoveler
Teal
Tufted duck
Wigeon
Cormorant
Little egret
White stork
Moorhen
Coot
Black-tailed godwit
Dunlin
Golden plover
Lapwing
Redshank
Snipe
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
Stonechat
Tree sparrow
Water pipit
Pheasant
Stock dove
Wood pigeon
Buzzard
Marsh harrier
Red kite

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Wildlife sightings – 08/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-08-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-08-01-19/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2019 11:59:33 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85464 a.m. Tide Level: Mid

Wader Lake

Water rail 3

Lapwing 63

Teal 41

Black-headed gull 110

Lesser black-backed gulls 2

Grey heron 1

Common snipe 1

Northern shoveller 6

Saline Lagoon

Curlew 16

Shelduck 2

Teal 10

Hawthorn Wood

Coal tit 3

Robin 2

Great spotted woodpecker 2

Bullfinch 9

Chaffinch 11

Blue tit 4

Great tit 7

Redpoll 6

Goldfinch 4

Dunnock 1

Brambling 2

Other birds

Redshank – 1 – River Wear

Stock dove – 1 – Heron hedge

Kestrel – 1 – Heron hedge

Redwing – 7 – Wader Lake path

Wren – 1 – Saline Meadow path

Blackbird – 3 – Saline Meadow path

Tufted duck – 60 – Reservoir

Mammals

Roe deer (Top Meadow)

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A flash of blue https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/85460/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/85460/#respond Tue, 08 Jan 2019 10:20:50 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85460

5 Jack Snipe – main lake(2), wader scrape(3) – highest count of the winter and nationally significant

1 Bittern – main lake

5 Pintail – main lake, reservoir lagoon

5 Snipe – wader scrape

2 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

1 Kingfisher – wildside

3 Redwing – South route

2 House Sparrow – world wetlands, then flew W (very scarce species on this site)

1 Peregrine – perched on hospital ledge

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit, Kingfisher.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Yellow-browed Warbler https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/yellow-browed-warbler-4/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/yellow-browed-warbler-4/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 15:53:11 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85448 Staff member (James Robinson) heard and spotted a Yellow-browed Warbler whilst out on a lunchtime walk, the bird has been favouring the trees on the mound at the Otter Enclosure and adjacent to the flamingo house.

Other birds noted in the same area include three Lesser Redpoll, c35 Goldfinch, Treecreeper and a few territorial Goldcrests.

Spinney Wood

Two Treecreeper calling and chasing about the trees this morning.

Rushy Hide

103 Bewick’s Swans present at dawn. The drake Pochard x Ferruginous Duck hybrid was present among the Pochard, Tufted Duck, Pintail, Shelduck and Mallards. The confiding drake Shoveler was also still present as usual.

Martin Smith Hide

Jack and Common Snipe present on the Eastern island but hidden in the cut rush/sedge.

Tack Piece

At least 16 Ruff, 26 Redshank 40 Curlew and 100s of Lapwing today. On the morning round 94 European White-fronted Geese flew in to feed and the Bewick’s Swans chose to feed here today.

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Bewick’s swans arrive https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-arundel-sightings/bewicks-swans-arrive/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-arundel-sightings/bewicks-swans-arrive/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 15:34:22 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85443

 

On Thursday morning I arrived early in time to count 10 Bewick’s swans leaving Arundel Wetland Centre at around 8 am. In the group a lone adult was traveling with three juvenile swans. These youngsters would have hatched this year, visiting the Arun Valley for the first time. The adult seems to have lost her/his partner as Bewick’s Swans mate for life and travel as a family group. They can live for 30 years. This group left first on followed by the remaining six swans.

In the 1960s 150 plus Bewick’s Swans were recorded regularly at Arundel Wetland Centre. Since 1995 the number of Bewick’s swans making the migration from arctic Russia to northern Europe has plummeted by nearly a half – from 29,000 to just 18,000. The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust is researching the decline of Bewick’s Swans. Climate change is a factor, with fewer swans having to traveling as far as West Sussex to find a warmer winter.

Recent sightings by WWT wardens at Arundel Wetland Centre.

Tues 1 Jan

Woodland loop: great spotted woodpecker

Wetlands Discovery channels: tufted ducks, grey heron, cormorant.

Ramsar hide: 2 shelducks, 1 cormorant, 2 wigeon, 30 snipe.

Sand Martin hide: 16 teal, grey wagtail, 5 tufted ducks, 7 shelduck, 1 grey heron, 19 pochard, 2 gadwall.

Tundra pen: grey heron, a little egret

Scrape Hide: 2 water rail (Trumpeter pen approach), 10 shoveler, 2 shelducks, 9 gadwall, 2 little grebes.

Long path: a fieldfare.

Wet meadow: song thrush

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 1 kingfisher, 12 pochard, 3 teal, 2 gadwall.

 

Wed 2 Jan

Lapwing hide: 2 teal, 2 lapwing

Scrape hide: 7 gadwall, 9 shoveler, 1 kingfisher, 2 snipe, 2 little grebe

Long path: water rail

Woodland loop: grey wagtail

Tundra Pen: 3 Bewick’s Swans leaving in the morning.

 

Thurs 3 Jan

Ramsar/Sand Martin large lagoon: 10 Bewick’s swans overnight roost (3 juveniles), 1 cattle egret, 12 little egret, 1 cormorant, 12 shelducks, 22 teal, 2 lapwing, 7 gadwall, 16 pochard, 18 snipe, 1 little grebe.

Reedbed: 6 marsh harriers

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 2 grey heron, 2 cormorants, 15 pochards, 1 little egret.

Discovery hide: 1 bullfinch.

Scrape hide: 11 shoveler ducks, 2 shelducks, 1 kingfisher, 1 grey heron, little grebe, 1 water rail (in front of hide)

Wildlife garden: kingfisher (opposite)

Lapwing hide: 3 teal.

Woodland Lodge feeders: 2 chaffinch.

 

Fri 4 Jan

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 1 little egret, 1 cormorant, 6 pochard, 2 gadwall, 1 kingfisher, 4 snipe.

Offham hangar: peregrine.

Ramsar/Sand Martin hide: 5 snipe, 6 cormorant, 10 wigeon, 16 shelducks, 11 gadwall, 4 lapwing, 1 grey heron, 8 teal, 1 common gull, heard Bewick’s Swans leaving in the morning.

Wildlife garden: 16 goldfinches, 2 bullfinches.

Long path: 1 kingfisher.

Scrape hide: 10 shoveler, 2 shelduck.

Reedbed hide: 6 snipe, 3 mandarin ducks, 2 teal, 1 water rail.

 

Sat 5 Jan

Arun Riverlife Lagoon: 7 pochard, 7 shoveler, 2 teal.

Woodland Loop: 1 great spotted woodpecker.

Reedbed: long-tailed tit. 2 teal.

Scrape hide: 18 teal, 14 shoveler, 2 shelducks, 2 little grebe, 5 snipe, 1 grey wagtail.

Ramsar hide: 4 pochards, 16s helduck, 4 shoveler, 3 lapwing, 1 black-tailed godwit, 10 snipe, 2 wigeon, heard Bewick’s Swans leaving in the morning.

 

Mon 7 Jan

Arun Riverlife: 8 teal, 1 grey heorn,7 pochard, 2 cormorant, 2 gadwall.

Wetlands Discovery: 3 Cetti’s warbler, 1 grey heron

Tundra pen: grey heron, 1 little egret.

Lapwing hide: 2 lapwing, 10 snipe, 1 shoveler, 2 gadwall

Ramsar/Sand Martin hides: 11 teal, 20 shelducks, 5 cormorants, 2 grey heron, 10 pochard, 2 lapwing, 4 snipe, 3 shoveler, 12 gadwall, 4 wigeon.

Scrape Hide: 2 shelducks, 38 teal, 6 shoveler, 10 snipe.

 

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Recent – Sightings 7th January 2019 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-7th-january-2019/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-7th-january-2019/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 13:04:16 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85434 Count taken at Low tide this morning.

Happy New Year to all! Hopefully the new year will be just as good for birds this year as it was last year!

The highlights this morning were the wintering ducks assemblage on the Main lake and the infrequently sighted Bar-tail Godwits.

The Tufted Duck numbers have a new high for this winter season, utilising the shelter the main lake and the surrounding vegetation provides from the elements. A number of Shoveler have been seen over the Christmas period and are continuing to stay around too. In addition Gadwall and Teal are continually being seen daily on the Main lake and Wadermarsh habitats.

A pair of Bar-tailed Godwits were seen ion front of the Brent Hide this morning; foraging in the “rivers” flowing out of Castle Espie. The Mudflats are better suited for the hard to distinguish Black-tail Godwit, which are common here throughout the winter, but occasional Bar-tails do turn up. Like this morning! Shorter and more sturdy than their longer legged cousins, the Bar-tail Godwit’s feathers on its back create a striking marbled effect that is quite beautiful.

 

Juvenile Bar-tailed Godwit from Harrier Hide this afternoon (T. Disley)

Juvenile Bar-tailed Godwit 

Estuary – visible from the Brent Hide and the Limekiln Observatory

Brent Goose 42, Shelduck 63, Wigeon 3, Oystercatcher 13, Redshank 19, Black-headed Gull 33, Grey Heron 1, Curlew 3, Bar-tail Godwit 2

Main lake – visible from Sensory garden and Visitor centre

Mallard 230, Tufted Duck 66, Shoveler 4, Gadwall 8, Teal 23, Moorhen 8, Coot 2

Shingle bank – visible from Sensory garden, Wadermarsh and Visitor Centre

Mallard 14, Teal 17, Cormorant 1, Moorhen 5, Jackdaw 7

Wadermarsh – visible from Wadermarsh lookout and Brent Hide

Moorhen 12, Oystercatcher 2

Freshwater Lagoon – visible from Brent Hide and Crannóg

Mallard 9

Saline Lagoon – visible from Limekiln observatory

Little Grebe 2

Limestone Lake

Mallard 2

Peninsula Field and Saltmarsh

Jackdaw

Brickworks

Blackbird, Song Thrush, Jackdaw 14, Hooded Crow

Woodland

Blackbird, Wren, Dunnock, Wood pigeon, Jay, Robin, Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, Chaffinch, Bullfinch, Goldfinch, Goldcrest, Song Thrush, Mistle Thrush, House Sparrow

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Sightings for Monday 7th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-monday-7th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/sightings-for-monday-7th-january/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 11:50:06 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85428 Dry day here at Welney today, all hide are open.

Sightings so far today:

Bewick’s swan
Mute swan
Whooper swan
Barnacle goose
Brent goose
Greylag goose
Pink-Footed goose (59)
White-fronted goose
Gadwall
Goldeneye
Mallard
Pintail
Pochard
Ring-necked duck
Shelduck
Shoveler
Teal
Tufted duck
Wigeon
Great egret
Little egret
Moorhen
Black-tailed godwit
Curlew
Dunlin
Golden plover
Lapwing
Ringed plover
Ruff
Snipe
Goldfinch
Long-tailed tit
Pied wagtail
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
Carrion crow
Pheasant
Common gull
Black-headed gull
Great black-backed gull
Kestrel
Marsh harrier
Sparrowhawk

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Wildlife sightings – 07/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-07-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-07-01-19/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 11:07:56 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85452 a.m. Tide Level: Low

Wader Lake

Snipe 4

Teal 86

Lapwing 7

Shelduck 29

Heron 3

Shoveler 4

Saline Lagoon

Snipe 1

Teal 4

Curlew 44

Hawthorn Wood

Brambling 4

Reed bunting 2

Lesser redpoll 4

Common/mealy redpoll 1

Greenfinch 1

Willow tit 1

Chaffinch 15

Siskin 1

Goldfinch 7

Great spotted woodpecker 1

Long-tailed tit 5

Nuthatch 1

Other birds

Long-tailed tit – 6 – Compost toiler

Kestrel – 1 – Compost toilet

Goosander – 2 – River Wear

Goldeneye – 1 – River Wear

Great black-backed gull – 3 – River Wear

Tufted duck – 40 – Reservoir

Shelduck – 1 – flew over Forgotten Meadow

 

 

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Reserve Update Monday 7th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-monday-7th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-monday-7th-january/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 10:48:54 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85426 Blustery start to the day but this is proving ideal for wader watching.  Mixed flock of over 300 Golden Plover and Lapwing in the Lochar field.  This field has also been good recently for Redshank, Curlew, Black-tailed Godwit and Dunlin so do have a scan through.  The foggy weather yesterday saw a peak count for this winter of over 200 Whooper Swans on the Whooper Pond.  Numbers back to more usual levels this morning.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 154 (including 17 cygnets)
Mute Swan 62 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose11
Mallard 198
Tufted Duck 29
Greater Scaup 1
Teal 11
Wigeon 178
Moorhen 7
Oystercatcher 2

Folly Pond
Teal 470
Wigeon 125
Shoveler 25
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4

Teal Pond
Mallard 7
Moorhen 1
Barnacle Geese 31

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

rhiannon.hatfield@wwt.org.uk

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Jack Snipe and Common Snipe on the wader scrape https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/jack-snipe-and-common-snipe-on-the-wader-scrape/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/jack-snipe-and-common-snipe-on-the-wader-scrape/#respond Mon, 07 Jan 2019 09:41:54 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85422

(Snipe)

2 Bittern – main lake (North shore). Headley and Dulverton Hides

6 Pintail – main lake, reservoir lagoon

6 Snipe – scrape(4), main lake(2)

2 Jack Snipe – scrape

 

December/January bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

 

 

 

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Wild Winter Weekend Day 2 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/wild-winter-weekend-day-2/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/wild-winter-weekend-day-2/#respond Sun, 06 Jan 2019 15:44:26 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85407 Rushy Hide

Just under 100 Bewick’s Swans were present at dawn plus the usual gathering of Greylag and Canada Geese, Pintail, Pochard, Tufted Duck, Mallard, Shelduck, Coot and Moorhen. The lower pond holding Teal and Lapwing.

Martin Smith Hide

Good views across the many species using the Tack Piece, in the pool near the hide were four Snipe and the Jack Snipe showed on and off on the right hand island. A Water Rail also came in and out of cover to feed in the cut areas. Two Cetti’s Warbler called from the sedges and were involved in territorial disputes. A singe Chiffchaff was also noted.

Tack Piece

Wigeon, Teal and a few Shoveler were on the scrape, small flocks of Dunlin, Snipe, Ruff, Redshank and Curlew fed in the flood puddles. The majority of the Bewick’s Swans spent the day grazing here. At least six Crane were feeding on the field.

Holden Tower

Two Peregrine, a male Sparrowhawk, up to nine Cranes and flocks of Barnacle and Canada Geese were on the Dumbles.

South Lake

Single Oystercatcher, 12 Snipe, 6 Common Gulls dropped in this afternoon amongst the Black-headed and Herring Gulls. Two Little Egret called in for a short time but flew off N. Single Great Crested Grebe with the diving ducks. Six Cormorant included one in breeding plumage, now sporting white thigh patches and a white head. Wader numbers fluctuated with Dunlin and Lapwing flocks spending time here plus small numbers of Black-tailed Godwit.

Zeiss Hide/Top and Bottom New Piece

Flocks of Golden Plover, Lapwing, Snipe and Teal. The E. White-fronted Geese have been rather flighty but appeared here a few times today.

Grounds

Three Lesser Redpoll feeding in the trees near the Otter Enclosure.

 

 

 

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Latest Sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/latest-sightings-755/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/latest-sightings-755/#respond Sun, 06 Jan 2019 14:48:06 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85404 Overcast but not particularly cold in the light winds today.

Solid numbers of wildfowl using the reserve with fifteen species of swan, geese and duck present with upwards of 15,000 birds; Mute Swan, Whooper Swan, Pink-footed Geese, Greylag, Canada, Shelduck, Mallard, Teal, Wigeon, Gadwall, Pintail, Shoveler, Pochard, Tufted and Goldeneye.

Check any Pink-footed Geese flocks for rarer geese.

Barn Owl(s) and Tawny Owl(s) have been showing daily. Barn Owl can be seen well from the Ron Barker Hide but also distantly from other hides. For direction for the Tawny Owl(s) call in at the in focus shop.

Barn Owl showing well from the Ron Barker Hide (Karl Bishop)

Merlin, Peregrine, Marsh Harrier, 3+ Buzzard, 2 Sparrowhawk and Kestrel all today.

As of late 700+ Lapwing, 70+ Black-tailed Godwit, 60+ Ruff and many Snipe.

In last 8 years we’ve put together a year list of bird species seen on/from the reserve. The numbers fluctuate so in 2018 we recorded 153 species compared to 169 in 2012.

We are off to a good start with yesterday’s Bewick’s Swan(s) and today Treecreeper has been seen along the Nature Trail. Any count over 90 species for January is good. We’ll keep you posted when we add new species from the 1st Feb onward.

 

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2499/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2499/#respond Sun, 06 Jan 2019 11:59:37 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85399 Bewick’s swan
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag goose
Canada goose
Barnacle goose
White-fronted goose x 8
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal (escapee)
Pochard
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
Little egret
Curlew x 10
Black-tailed godwit
Ruff
Redshank
Snipe
Dunlin
Lapwing
Golden plover
Black-headed gull
Common gull
Starling
Pied wagtail
Cetti’s warbler
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Linnet
Great tit
Blue tit
Long-tailed tit
Blackbird
Magpie
Rook
Sparrowhawk
Kestrel
Marsh harrier x 2
Buzzard
Short-eared owl
Barn Owl

Mammals
Roe deer x 5
Brown hare
Weasel

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Kingfisher in Wildside https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/kingfisher-in-wildside/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/kingfisher-in-wildside/#respond Sun, 06 Jan 2019 10:09:33 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85397

Kingfisher by Alec Pelling

 

1 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

3 Pintail – main lake

5 Snipe – wader scrape

2 Jack Snipe – wader scrape

2 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

1 Kingfisher – Wildside

1 Kestrel – sheltered lagoon

 

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

 

 

 

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Wild Winter Saturday https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/wild-winter-saturday/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/wild-winter-saturday/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2019 19:39:50 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85394 The drake Goldeneye is still present but no sign yet of the female.  The drake has occasionally disappeared from the South Lake, but we’ve refound him on the Big Pen next to the Visitor Centre, so keep an eye open as your cross the boardwalk.

Martin Smith Hide

The Jack Snipe was showing again on the island this lunchtime.
.

Zeiss Hide

Out on the Dumbles were 170+ Barnacle Geese along with 6 Cranes, whilst in the reedbed in front of the hide a Water Rail and Cetti’s Warbler were seen. A flock of 112 White-fronted Geese were seen just after midday but they have been very flighty today moving around several fields.  A pair of Peregrine on the gateposts put in front.
.

Rushy Hide

A total of 101 Bewick’s Swans were on the Rushy this morning along with Indri on the Big Pen next to the Visitor Centre brings us to 102 on site.

 

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Bewick’s Swan https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/bewicks-swan-8/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/bewicks-swan-8/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2019 16:18:15 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85391 After no sightings on the reserve during the winter period 2017-18, 2 Bewick’s Swan flew onto the reserve late afternoon. The decline of wintering Bewick’s Swan has been dramatic given the record count at Martin Mere is 1046 during the winter of 1990-91. There is currently only 9 birds in Lancashire so far this winter.

One of a pair of Bewick’s Swan that flew in late afternoon.

We’ll do a fuller report of recent sightings either tomorrow or Monday. As usual if you check out the previous day’s sightings you’ll get a good idea as to what can be seen around the reserve.

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2498/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2498/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2019 13:46:36 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85385 Ring-necked duck (main observatory)

Bewick’s swan
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada goose
White-fronted goose x 7
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal
Pochard
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
Grey heron
Great egret
Little egret
Black-tailed godwit
Redshank
Snipe
Dunlin
Lapwing
Golden plover
Black-headed gull
Starling
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Chaffinch
Great tit
Blue tit
Long-tailed tit
Wren
Fieldfare
Blackbird
Collared dove
Wood pigeon
Magpie
Jackdaw
Carrion crow
Rook
Kestrel
Peregrine
Marsh harrier
Buzzard

Mammals
Roe deer x 3

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Latest Sightings – Saturday 5th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-saturday-5th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/latest-sightings-saturday-5th-january/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2019 12:00:35 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85382 Still no sign of the Green-winged Teal since it was seen on the 2nd January. The two Greater Scaup are still on the Whooper Pond, one of them appears to have some Tufted Duck in it’s ancestry as it shows a Tufted Duck bill (completely dark tip, as opposed to a dark ‘nail’) making it a possible hybrid.

Yellowhammers have been showing well in the Avenue the past few days, as have the Barnacle Geese in the fields.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 148 (including 20 cygnets)
Mute Swan 60 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 8
Mallard 150
Tufted Duck 35
Greater Scaup 2
Teal 22
Wigeon 104
Moorhen 4

Folly Pond
Teal 470
Wigeon 125
Shoveler 25
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4

Teal Pond
Mallard 2
Moorhen 2

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

joe.bilous@wwt.org.uk

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Pintail showing well today https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/pintail-showing-well-today/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/pintail-showing-well-today/#respond Sat, 05 Jan 2019 11:22:57 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85380

Northern Pintail at Slimbridge by James Lees

2 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

7 Pintail – main lake

1 Shelduck – main lake

71 Lapwing – main lake

4 Snipe – wader scrape

17 Redwing – flew over heading SW

1 Water Pipit – wader scrape

1 Meadow Pipit – sheltered lagoon

1 Coal Tit – South route feeders

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Whooper swan spectacular this winter https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-news/its-a-whooper-swan-spectacular-at-martin-mere/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-news/its-a-whooper-swan-spectacular-at-martin-mere/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 16:46:51 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85372

Happy New Year! What better way to celebrate the start of the New Year than with a visit to WWT Martin Mere Wetland Centre. Come and discover why we’re the only place in the North West that welcomes thousands of whooper swans over winter. Every year, around 2,000 whooper swans migrate to here from Iceland […]]]>

Happy New Year! What better way to celebrate the start of the New Year than with a visit to WWT Martin Mere Wetland Centre. Come and discover why we’re the only place in the North West that welcomes thousands of whooper swans over winter. Every year, around 2,000 whooper swans migrate to here from Iceland and spend the winter on the mere. To celebrate these amazing swans, we’ve got a number of swan-themed activities at the centre.

Every Saturday in January we are holding our Swans Awake event. Book your tickets to experience the thrill of an early morning hide visit with a warden and watch as the mere comes to life as the sun rises, followed by a full English breakfast in our café. If early mornings aren’t for you, try one of our Floodlit Swan events instead. Held on Tuesday evenings in January, you can witness the stunning sight of the wildlife coming in to roost for the evening, all lit up by our floodlights.

As well as these bookable events, we have a number of free activities throughout the centre. In our Exhibition Hall we have our swan pipe experience which is a brilliant opportunity to put yourself in the place of a swan during a catch. You’ll be able to go through a replica swan pipe, try on a swan jacket that we use to catch swans, learn how we take measurements including the wingspan of swans, weigh yourself in swan weight and create your own swan ring to keep as a souvenir of your experience.

For younger ones curious about nature we have our Discovery Trail. Collect a booklet on arrival and explore our grounds to find the answers to questions such as how fast do swans fly and how far do they travel. Every child that completes the trail gets a sticker for their swan ID card. The discovery tail is a great way to spend some time exploring as a family and learning as you go.

As well as the discovery trail, you can learn all about WWT’s conservation work both past, present and future by taking a look at the WWT Conservation Exhibition in our Exhibition Hall. WWT is a pioneer in wetland conservation – our scientists and conservationists have led the way for more than 70 years.

This winter, wrap up warm and come and enjoy the great outdoors at Martin Mere.

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Have a wild winter at Martin Mere Wetland Centre https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-news/have-a-wild-winter-at-martin-mere-wetland-centre/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-news/have-a-wild-winter-at-martin-mere-wetland-centre/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 16:39:09 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85367

At Martin Mere Wetland Centre we’re here for you and for wildlife 364 days a year, so don’t let a little thing like the weather put you off spending a day in the great outdoors. This Christmas holiday, throw on a coat, grab your wellies and head out for a wild winter adventure – we’re […]]]>

At Martin Mere Wetland Centre we’re here for you and for wildlife 364 days a year, so don’t let a little thing like the weather put you off spending a day in the great outdoors. This Christmas holiday, throw on a coat, grab your wellies and head out for a wild winter adventure – we’re open every day apart from Christmas Day!

Wetlands are incredible spaces teeming with wildlife all year round. Visit us this season and you’ll be amazed to discover that while a lot of animals do leave or nod off in the colder months, there’s still a lot that’s wide awake. Seasonal wildlife spectaculars include flocks of pink footed geese, lapwing and teal on our Mere and colourful woodland birds gathering at our Kingfisher and Ron Barker Hides. Learn more about the current highlights from our Guide in the Discovery Hide – every day between 12-3pm.

The colder months are also the perfect time of year to see the Icelandic whooper swans which migrate to Martin Mere every winter. To celebrate these beautiful swans coming to visit, we’ve got a number of swan-themed activities at the centre, including our swan pipe experience, daily swan feeds and a swan-themed discovery trail.

On the collection side of the centre we have a number of iconic wetland species including our cheeky Asian short-clawed otter family. Discover more about them during daily talks at 11.30am and 2.30pm and find out how WWT is working to save them and other wetland species. When you visit, you can hand-feed our characterful ducks, geese and swans or take a wintry walk amid stunning scenery.

And once your wildlife-watching is done, there’s tasty fare aplenty in our cafe, with festive treats, winter warmers and a new breakfast menu. Our site has excellent access and full visitor centre facilities including a well-stocked shop full of gifts, books and bird care goodies.

Find out more on our website: https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/martin-mere/experience/wild-winter/

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Recent sightings 1st-4th January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-1st-4th-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-1st-4th-january/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 15:36:12 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85358

WWT stock image of a Goldcrest by Jamie MacCallum

British Steel Hide

After a successful Tick and Twitch in Tuesday, it has been a bit quiet from the Steel Hide later in the week. Small numbers of Lapwing, Greenshank and Redshank have been seen, as well as Snipe hidden in the rushes. Large groups of Wigeon and Shelduck frequent the Saline Lagoons. Water Pipit, Great White Egret and Spoonbill where seen on Tuesday, as well as Red-breasted Mergansers out on the estuary

Millennium Wetlands

The Wetlands have been rather busy with large numbers of Gadwall, Teal, Tufted Duck and Shoveler. A pair of Shelduck and a Male Pintail has been seen from the Herons Wing hide regularly this week. Our resident Barn Owl was seen hunting late Thursday afternoon. Treecreeper and Goldcrest have been seen in and around Black poplar wood. Over the course of this week we have had several good sightings of the Otter, the latest of which was Friday morning. The best places to see them are from the Herons Wing Hide and the Screens around Deep Water Lake.

 

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Longstanding Martin Mere volunteer gives us a sneak ‘beak’ into his day https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-news/one-of-martin-meres-longest-serving-volunteers-gives-as-sneak-beak-into-his-day/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-news/one-of-martin-meres-longest-serving-volunteers-gives-as-sneak-beak-into-his-day/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 15:29:53 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85349

The volunteers are WWT’s wings. Without their 1000 volunteers, the charity’s grand ambitions would never be met. One of their current longest serving volunteers is Dave Walsh, 73. He has been helping out at WWT’s Martin Mere in Lancashire for over 20 years. Dave and his wife Estelle, 73, took up an interest in birds […]]]>

The volunteers are WWT’s wings. Without their 1000 volunteers, the charity’s grand ambitions would never be met.

One of their current longest serving volunteers is Dave Walsh, 73. He has been helping out at WWT’s Martin Mere in Lancashire for over 20 years.

Dave and his wife Estelle, 73, took up an interest in birds when their children flew the nest. Fascinated by migratory birds, Dave would note their movements, becoming a vital asset to the reserve. Now a whooper swan research volunteer, Dave has devoted much of his time helping to monitor the welfare of thousands of birds that spend the winter there.

Never a dull minute, here Dave shares what he’s learned over the years.

We started around 1994/5. My wife and I began coming here, after our children grew up and left the family home, to take up bird watching. I was fascinated by the migratory whooper swans. Back then, there were also Bewick’s swans as well. We started noticing that some of the birds were ringed and at the back of the Raines Observatory, there used to be a list up of all the swans that had been seen. I was captivated by how some swans were regular visitors here and at other centres. We started taking the numbers down and one day we happened to be in the Kingfisher Hide when one of the wardens saw me noting down the numbers and asked me what I did with them. I said ‘nothing really – it’s just a bit of a hobby’ so he asked if I would let him have them. I made a list so they could add it to their data base. From there on it snowballed.

He was keen that we didn’t have uniform on as he said that people would stop and talk to us and that we wouldn’t be able to do our work – ring-reading and researching. This went on until 2007 when Autumnwatch came here and we were approached by Slimbridge who asked us to help identify swans for their team. Back then there were only a couple of us doing it. For a long time it was just my wife and I observing the whoopers. On that particular week there was hardly any swans here. But the second week, they started to arrive and we were interviewed by Kate Humble. Then they realised we needed uniforms.

In the winter, my duty – I don’t call it a job – is to go around the reserve and find the flocks of whooper swans and note down any ring numbers and also ascertain whether that particular bird has a mate. Is the mate ringed? How many cygnets have they brought back? Are they the same pair that were here last year? Is it the same mate?

My favourite part of the day is from 3pm onwards when most of the swans come back for their feed. It’s the best time for research work as I can see study families and individual pairs and so on.

You get to know certain birds. You get to know pairs so if you see one, you know the other will be nearby.

Virginia

We have one swan in particular that we’re all looking out for. She’s our superswan, a swan named Virginia. We’ve been following her since the year after she was ringed here – that’s over 20 years. We think she’s 26 years old. She hasn’t arrived yet but it’s early days. Sometimes she doesn’t appear until after Christmas. It’s not unusual. She has also been seen at Welney. She was caught and ringed as an adult so we don’t know her exact age. She’s quite a star. She turns up unexpectedly. You’ll be packing up late in the afternoon and she’ll suddenly show up. You think: ‘where the heck have you been?’ Sigrunn is another famous visitor who was first ringed in December 2002. His ring cracked in 2010 so they replaced it and let me keep the old one.

Another favourite was a bird called Marty. He was one of the reasons that I got into this. I’d seen him at Caelaverock where he was ringed. He had a partner called Merrytown who had been ringed at Martine Mere. I remember seeing him here in 1997 and the following year I visited Caerlaverock and lo and behold, he came out of the water. They knew him well. A week later I saw him at Martin Mere. When they first started ringing birds here, he was one of the few birds they could recognise without a ring. He was a big bird with a distinctive look. You couldn’t miss him. He flew into a pylon and died in Iceland so that was very sad. I think he would have probably been in his early twenties. He was quite an age when we started noticing him.

There was a swan called Ainsdale that we adopted. Quite a few people adopted her. She was one of those birds that you could guarantee you’d see. You can’t always say that. There used to be a couple from Yorkshire that only came here twice a year and they would ask me to point her out so that they could take a photo.

One of the main things that I have learned is that there are so many other people involved in this. We can remember Kane Brides (WWT’s Monitoring Officer) coming here as schoolboy. We’ve seen him grow into the man he is now. We’ve learnt a lot from him and he’s learnt a lot from us.

I love meeting people and chatting to visitors who show a genuine interest in the migrating swans, especially young people. The number of young people that get involved in it is really impressive. We have a young girl whose parents bought her a decent pair of binoculars and she comes and does ring-reading. I think she must be about six or seven now. She’s not the only one. Lots of other children show a keen interest in the migrations of birds.

The older visitors also show an interest. It’s surprising. We used to holiday a lot in Scotland and someone would stop us and say ‘you volunteer at Martin Mere’. It’s been a very enjoyable twenty years. It’s not just about the wildlife, the wildlife connects you to other people.

We’ve seen a lot of changes here. We’ve seen the reserve grow bigger. People come and go. The guy that got us into this retired years ago although we still swap Christmas cards. Everyone has been wonderful. We’ve loved every minute of this.

Being invited to catches is quite something. Our local news BBC North West Tonight got involved. We fitted tracking devices to some swans and they wanted to name two of them after the two male presenters. They had a competition to see which bird would reach Iceland first. They were very privileged to be allowed to film.

I think people would be surprised by how efficient we are at managing wild birds. Humans are potential enemies to them yet we ring and monitor these animals that fly thousands of miles from remote locations in the far north without much issue.

My role is important because the more we know about wildfowl the better we can look after them. The successes of ringing and catching birds means we know where they’re going, what route they’re taking, where they’re stopping off so we know where we can help out if there is a problem on the way. We can tell if the birds are healthy. If they started showing up overweight or underweight then we would want to know why. I think it’s very important that we continue this research work because it benefits the birds.

Every year is different. What happens in one year, doesn’t happen the next.

This place – the whole WWT – is a charity. This duckery behind me is called the WG Harvey Duckery. He was born in my hometown of Bury in Lancashire and his family had a tannery there. They used to take the skin from animals and convert it into material. He left a lot of money to Martin Mere – he left us a legacy. Without people like that and donations from any source, wills, membership, adopting, support from funders like Postcode Animal Trust, a grant-giving charity funded by players of People’s Postcode Lottery, obviously helps to keep the place going.

You don’t realise that people are members for totally different reasons. One day, I was in the playground with my grandchildren on a lovely afternoon and sat next to me were two young ladies with small children. A flock of whooper swans flew over our heads and this lady said to me: ‘Where are they going?’ I told her they were heading for the Mere. Turned out that they were members who lived in Southport and they have never been around the grounds, never seen the Mere. The only reason they were members was because the playground was safe and there was a nice café and shop. They’d been members for over two years. I suggested that they walk around the reserve and see the birds. The next time I saw her she said she had took my advice. No one would believe me.

When the kids flew the nest, we sat down and decided that we need to do something together. We took up hillwalking and bought binoculars. We started seeing birds and wondering what was what. It was ballroom or birds, and we chose birds.

I used to love seeing the list of birds with the observers marked against them. We had a code and ours was DEW – Dave and Estelle Walsh. They used to put a question mark beside our sightings as we were beginners. Eventually that question mark disappeared.

I could give you a boot-full of funny stories. I was in the Swan Link hide – at one point thought to be the largest hide in Europe – and someone asked how the swans got here. One lady replied that we heard them all into a giant aircraft and fly them over from Iceland.

People will say: ‘I have a silly question’ but I always tell them there’s no such thing. I’ll always try to answer. Kids ask some of the best and most profound questions. They’re our future. Last year we had a young lad called Jack. He started as a volunteer when he was 16. His real interest was the wild side of the reserve. My wife started mentoring him and he spent all winter with her. He’s now at Bangor University studying conservation. He’ll be another Kane.

If you love wildlife, being outdoors and sharing your passion for nature, why not have a look at some of WWT’s volunteer roles?

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A chilly Friday https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/a-chilly-friday/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/a-chilly-friday/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 14:46:04 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85351 A pair of Goldeneye arrived on the deep lake of the South Lake mid-morning and were a nice treat.  The species is less than annual on the reserve, with adult males even scarcer.  Otherwise it was a rather cold start with many of the shallower waterbodies frozen over and ducks crammed into tight groups on the remaining open water, or heading towards the river.

Robbie Garnett Hide

Five Cranes were on the Tack Piece this morning along with 320+ Wigeon.  This afternoon the flood water gathering in the corner of the field from the pump held 21 Ruff, 12 Redshank, 21 Snipe, 100+ Dunlin and a Curlew.
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Holden Tower

A pair of Peregrine were out on the cross fence again, a flock of 11 Cranes were on the Dumbles and 200+ Curlew flew up river.
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Zeiss Hide

A small number of Teal were on the unfrozen area of water to the south of the hide and 21 Ruff were roosting on the islands
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Kingfisher Hide

The White-fronted Geese flock was on the Four Score (field to left of nesting bank) and appears to have increased again to 133 birds.
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Rushy Hide

A total of 99 Bewick’s Swans were on the pond this morning ahead of the feed, with late news from yesterday being an extra 4 birds bringing us to 104 birds in all.  Over 130 birds have been recorded on the reserve so far this season thanks to their unique bill patterns.
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South Lake Hides

A ever increasing flock of Lapwing were crammed on the island in the middle of the frozen wader scrape.  At first 207 birds were present, more arrived bringing the flock to 289 and then more arrived taking us over 300.  The deep lake was one of the few patches of open water and was busy with birds including 88 Shoveler, 141 Tufted Duck, 89 Pochard, 4 Wigeon, 3 Pintail, 86 Shelduck, the Great Crested Grebe and numerous Teal and Mallard.  On the causeway keeping one eye on a Great Black-backed Gull and the Herring Gull flock were 12 Black-tailed Godwits and the Oystercatcher.

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Great White Egret again https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/great-white-egret-again/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/great-white-egret-again/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 14:07:13 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85347 The Great White Egret was reported again distantly from Harrier Hide, also a Peregrine on view from here.

A Water Rail has been showing from Ron Barker Hide in the ditch in front of the hide and a Chiffchaff was seen by Kingfisher hide yesterday.

Up to 70 Ruff can easily be seen around the 3pm feed from Discovery Hide, also up to 20 Black-tailed Godwit. A single Dunlin was on the Mere with Lapwings mid afternoon.

Still up to 3 Goldeneye being seen mainly on the Mere. Barn Owls continue to show occasionally during the day at the moment. The two pairs of Tawny Owls are still being reported at either end of the reserve, for directions call in to the In Focus shop or to report any of your sightings.

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Wildlife sightings 04/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/unassigned/wildlife-sightings-04-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/unassigned/wildlife-sightings-04-01-19/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 11:07:47 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85342 a.m. low tide

Wader Lake

lapwing 110

snipe 2

shelduck 11

teal 7

redshank

water rail

Saline lagoon

Curlew 83

Teal 5

Jay

Hawthorn Wood

Brambling 9

Chaffinch 22

Goldfinch 2

Greenfinch 4

Lesser redpoll 6

Willow tit 2

Long tailed tit 6

nuthatch 2

Great spotted woodpecker 2

Treecreeper

Reed bunting

Other birds

Redwing 10 – Wader Lake footpath

Sparrowhawk (female) Hawthorn Wood scrub

River

Grey heron 3

Cormorant 2

Black headed gull – 350

Greater black backed gull

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Calling Water Rail https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/calling-water-rail/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/calling-water-rail/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 10:27:50 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85340

1 Goldeneye – sheltered lagoon

4 Pintail – main lake

7 Mandarin – main lake, wildside

3 Water Rail – reservoir lagoon, reedbed, sheltered lagoon (all calling)

1 Siskin – South route

1 Coal Tit – South route feeders

1 Little Owl – World wetlands

1 Peregrine – hunting over the wader scrape

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

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Today’s sightings – Ring-necked duck https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-ring-necked-duck/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-ring-necked-duck/#respond Fri, 04 Jan 2019 09:48:09 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85337

Ring-necked duck alongside a pochard

Ring-necked duck – 1 male in amongst the pochard right in front of the main hide.

Today’s sightings:

Bewick’s swan
Mute swan
Whooper swan
Barnacle goose
Greylag goose
White-fronted goose
Goldeneye
Gadwall
Mallard
Pintail
Pochard
Ringed-neck duck
Ringed teal (Escapee)
Teal
Tufted duck
Shelduck
Shoveler
Wigeon
Great egret
Little egret
White stork
Coot
Moorhen
Water rail
Black-tailed godwit
Curlew
Lapwing
Snipe
Goldfinch
House sparrow
Tree sparrow
Reed bunting
Starling
Stonechat
Fieldfare
Redwing
Green woodpecker
Black-headed gull
Great black-backed gull
Stock dove
Kestrel
Rough-legged buzzard

 

Otter = 3
Roe deer = 12

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2497/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2497/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 15:50:35 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85330 Ring-necked duck – 1 male in amongst the pochard right in front of the main hide
Bewick’s swan
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada goose
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal
Pochard
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Coot
Grey heron
Moorhen
Little egret
Black-tailed godwit
Redshank
Snipe
Dunlin
Lapwing
Golden plover
Starling
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Linnet
Great tit
Stonechat
Collared dove
Wood pigeon
Rook
Kestrel
Marsh harrier
Short-eared owl

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Goshawk again https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/thursday-sightings/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/thursday-sightings/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 12:31:58 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85323 Holden Tower

The Dark-bellied Brent Goose was among Canada Geese on south end of the Dumbles (near Royal Drift) until flushed by a walker with dogs. The two Peregrines were also initially present.

Tack Piece

The Wigeon and Teal flock are keeping faithful to the scrape in the day, as is typical at the moment, the field became busier throughout the day. A flock of 7 Cranes were present from late morning including an unringed bird and the flocks of Lapwing contained Redshank and Curlew.

Rushy Hide

The Bewick’s Swan flock still in good voice at the feeds with 70+ Pintail, 100+ Pochard and 200+ Tufted Duck adding to the Canada and Greylag Goose, Mallard, Shelduck and Lapwing flocks.

Duck Decoy

The Goshawk made an appearance over the Decoy as it headed toward the Tack Piece at approx 12.35pm.

Three different Cetti’s Warblers were contact calling near the public paths/boardwalk. Blackbirds were again mobbing what is likely to be a Tawny Owl in the largest ivy covered Ash tree.

South Lake

Little and Great Crested Grebe, Pochard, Tufted Duck, Mallard and Cormorant all about the deep lake. On the wader scrape the Lapwing and Black-tailed Godwit flocks were roosting and feeding in the shallows with 130+ Shoveler and 100+ Teal.

Zeiss Hide/Top New Piece and Bottom New Piece

Most birds were flushed by a walker with dogs first thing so no so much to report from our observations.

70 Golden Plover were among the Lapwing and 240+ Teal and a single Pintail was on the flood. The banks near the hides held 500+ Wigeon.

120+ European White-fronted Geese flew from the Four Score field to the Dumbles after being flushed, they moved again later in the morning when a helicopter flew over.

 

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Wildlife sightings – 03/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-03-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-03-01-19/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 11:26:52 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85320 a.m. Tide Level: Low (90% frozen)

Wader Lake

Curlew 260

Lapwing 70

Common snipe 1

Mute swan 2

Stock dove 3

Grey heron 2

Saline Lagoon

Black-headed gull 80

Curlew 8

Teal

Hawthorn Wood

Brambling 9

Chaffinch 12

Bullfinch 10

Greenfinch 2

Goldfinch 1

Siskin 2

Lesser redpoll 4

Great spotted woodpecker 2

Nuthatch 2

Treecreeper 1

Willow tit 2

Long-tailed tit 8

Other birds

Black-headed gull – 380 – River Wear

Cormorant – 3 – River Wear

Grey heron – 3 – River Wear

Goldeneye – 3 – River Wear

Jay – 2 – Hawthorn Wood

Shelduck – 16 – Reservoir

Shoveler – 2 – Reservoir

Teal – 14 – Reservoir

Tufted duck – 60 – Reservoir

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Slimbridge becomes an official Learning Destination for The Children’s University https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-news/slimbridge-becomes-an-official-learning-destination-for-the-childrens-university/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-news/slimbridge-becomes-an-official-learning-destination-for-the-childrens-university/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 10:45:22 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85290

Slimbridge Wetland Centre have become an official Learning Destination for The Children’s University – encouraging children to keep learning when they’re outside the classroom. The Children’s University is a national charity that works with schools to encourage children aged 5 to 14 to get involved in extra-curricular learning, with the aim of widening their interests, […]]]>

Slimbridge Wetland Centre have become an official Learning Destination for The Children’s University – encouraging children to keep learning when they’re outside the classroom.

The Children’s University is a national charity that works with schools to encourage children aged 5 to 14 to get involved in extra-curricular learning, with the aim of widening their interests, boosting self-confidence and building resilience.

Children registered with The Children’s University receive a ‘Passport to Learning’ to record the hours they spend participating in approved activities. When a significant number of hours have been accumulated, children receive an award to celebrate their achievements at a graduation ceremony.

Steph Wheeler, WWT Learning Officer, said “We’re delighted to become an official Learning Destination at Slimbridge. On a day out here visitors can experience a range of self-led outdoor learning activities including attending talks, watching feeds, handling amphibians and feeding the birds, as well as exciting additional activities during school holidays”.

Validated Learning Destinations are recognised by Children’s University as places that provide high-quality learning opportunities and experiences, and must pass a quality assurance process.

Steph said “We look forward to welcoming Children’s University members to Slimbridge and stamping their passports to celebrate their learning experiences with us, whether it be holding a newt, learning more about our playful otter family or feeding the world’s rarest goose from the palm of their hand!”

To find out how to register your children with The Children’s University and receive a ‘Passport to Learning’ visit The Children’s University website.

Slimbridge also offer a range of informative and engaging, curriculum-linked learning sessions for schools and groups. To find out more visit the Slimbridge Learning Zone website.

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Reserve Update Thursday 3rd January https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-thursday-3rd-january/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-thursday-3rd-january/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 10:44:41 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85317 Happy New Year to everyone.  Cooler start to 2019 which has drawn the smaller birds back into the Avenues, Treecreeper seen down Saltcot Loaning as well as Yellowhammers and Reed Bunting back in front of the Peter Scott Observatory.  Two male Hen Harriers out on the far merses.  A male Green-winged Teal dropped into the Teal pond briefly yesterday afternoon but has not been observed today so far.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie
ZVA – Bonsai

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 134 (including 23 cygnets)
Mute Swan 59 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 8
Mallard 156
Tufted Duck 37
Greater Scaup 1
Teal 22
Wigeon 104
Moorhen 4

Folly Pond
Teal 474
Wigeon 126
Shoveler 24
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4
Canada Goose 33
Greylag goose 1

Teal Pond
Mallard 2
Moorhen 2

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

rhiannon.hatfield@wwt.org.uk

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Giving Nature a Hand https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/unassigned/giving-nature-a-hand/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/unassigned/giving-nature-a-hand/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 10:28:52 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85243 Saltmarshes provide important wetland habitats for a range of organisms, in particular specialist plant communities and associated animals, and they are therefore of high conservation interest. They act as high tide refuges for wading birds and wildfowl that feed on adjacent mudflats, support breeding waders, gulls and terns, and are a source of food for passerines, particularly in autumn and winter.

However, saltmarsh is a relatively rare habitat in Northern Ireland with an estimate of its total extent here being a mere 250 hectares. This equates to only around 0.5% of the total UK saltmarsh (45,500 hectares). Part of WWT Castle Espie’s contribution to the Northern Ireland total is our Wadermarsh.

During the redevelopment in 2008/9, we tried to give nature a helping hand by creating the physical conditions that favour saltmarsh – creating islands that would encourage the establishment of saltmarsh plant communities, improving water level control via a new sluice etc. However, when working with nature, there are no certainties, and it became clear that the potential of the burgeoning saltmarsh habitat could be significantly improved by doing further work on it. To that end three of the Wadermarsh islands were reprofiled during the summer, thus ensuring that they would be totally covered at high tide. In addition, work was done to control the growth of vegetation on the shingle loafing bank to enhance its attractiveness for ground nesting species such as terns and Ringed Plover, while reducing the need for regular manual weeding by grounds staff. Now the work is finished…we wait!

Funding for this work was obtained from the Aughrim Landfill Programme, via Groundwork NI (administrator of
Aughrim Landfill Tax Credits), as an approved project under the Landill Tax Regulations 1996, and from global
law firm Eversheds Sutherland as part of their corporate responsibility programme.

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Bitterns in the reed fringes of the main lake https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/bitterns-in-the-reed-fringes-of-the-main-lake/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/bitterns-in-the-reed-fringes-of-the-main-lake/#respond Thu, 03 Jan 2019 10:02:14 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85313  

2 Bittern – main lake N shore (Headley and Dulverton Hides)

1 Jack Snipe – scrape

1 Water Pipit – marsh, scrape

1 Redpoll – south route Birches p.m.

10 Redwing – entrance area

6 Fieldfare – entrance area

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

4 Pintail – main lake

12 Mandarin – main lake, reservoir lagoon

 

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 4 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Cetti’s Warbler, Water Rail and Reed Bunting can be seen and heard in any of the reedbed areas, particularly on the wildside west route.

 

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Madagascar pochard https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-duck-diary/madagascar-pochard/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-diaries/wwt-slimbridge-diaries-duck-diary/madagascar-pochard/#respond Wed, 02 Jan 2019 17:01:04 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85306

The Madagascar pochard was once believed to be extinct. It was rediscovered in a remote lake in Madagascar in 2006 and thanks to conservation efforts and community involvement the species has been released back into the wild. Males have white eyes The ducks themselves are sleek and brown, with soft wet eyes and an adorable waddle. […]]]>

The Madagascar pochard was once believed to be extinct. It was rediscovered in a remote lake in Madagascar in 2006 and thanks to conservation efforts and community involvement the species has been released back into the wild.

Males have white eyes

The ducks themselves are sleek and brown, with soft wet eyes and an adorable waddle. Males exhibit a crisp white eye in the first year and a burnished bronze hue to their feathers, where females retain the juvenile brown eye and a biscuit coloured breast.

Their legs are set towards the rear of their bodies, as with all diving ducks, to aid their ducking and diving. Birds retain a sullen posture at rest, but can stretch their necks and fluff up their feathers when in a state of alert, distress, or display. When interacting with one another they can prove to be very charming indeed!

Discovery of what we thought was an extinct species

A few dozen Madagascar pochard were rediscovered in 2006 by the Peregrine fund. Lake Matsaborimena this volcanic crater lake proved to the last quiet and hugely unsuitable refuge for an entire species. The following year, more surveys were conducted to see whether there were any more to be found. After what felt like forever, it was observed that no; these really were the only ones.

Ducklings reared in a hotel bathroom

3 clutches of eggs were carefully taken from the wild, incubated, hatched and transported to a safe place. It was in a hotel bathroom where the experts tended to and reared the ducklings. Conservation efforts can be prove to be a hugely detailed and convoluted process, but in some circumstances, you simply have to act!

For over a year, the ducks were housed in a Durrell turtle rearing compound; safe and secure but not in a position to breed. After acquiring land and building a facility in the north following funding from the Darwin initiative, the future of the Madagascar pochard seemed bright!

Madagascar pochard have successfully bred in captivity

Since 2012 the Madagascar pochard has been breeding successfully within their purpose-built compound. Here, various stakeholders have visited the ducks, and Malagasy teams have been trained in their rearing and care. The ducks were so successful at rearing, that in 2016 it was already time to act.

Reintroduction to Lake Sofia in 2018

Lake Sofia was identified as their final destination, and a plan emerged. And so, a decade after their first collection, in 2018 the Madagascar pochard have been returned to the wild for the first time.

Every good aviculturist knows what risks these birds face, and we hope that the wealth of knowledge gleaned from caring for them in captivity will go towards making this a success. Hopefully this small, brown diving duck can be safe once more.

Phoebe’s visit to Madagascar

During 2010 and 2011, I was lucky enough to head to Madagascar to support the Madagascar pochard project whilst it was in its infancy. We supported the conservation team by tending to the birds and looking to their future.

Life is different in Madagascar. You share your space with anything small enough to get into it; both creepy and crawly. The pochard compound where we housed and cared for the birds contained caterpillars that looked like something out of your wildest imagination, and butterflies like saucers.

Lemurs of 3-4 species passed by daily, at different times according to their patrols. With all this going on, it was more than novel to remember that you were looking at over 50% of the world population of a species of duck. What a weight!

Find out more about the Madagascar pochard reintroduction on our news pages.

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Sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/sightings-42/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/sightings-42/#respond Wed, 02 Jan 2019 15:45:15 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85300 Happy New Year to all our readers!

A summary of recent days sightings, a Great White Egret was seen again on New Years Day from Ron Barker Hide. Up to 3 Little Egrets can be seen around the reserve most days.

Barn Owls have been showing well at times from mid afternoon onwards around the back edge of the Mere in recent days. Tawny Owls continue to be seen at either ends of the reserve, call in to the In Focus shop for details.

A juv female Peregrine continues to be seen most days, also 1-2 Merlin being seen most days as well as the usual Marsh Harriers, Common Buzard, Sparrowhawk and Kestrel.

On the Reedbed walk Cetti’s Warblers (at least 4 males this year) can be heard and seen if lucky or patient, Water Rail are present here too with one being heard calling by the Harrier Hide on New Years Day. Towards the end of the Community Redbed walk up to 2-3 Corn Bunting can be seen most days, also the chance of Yellowhammer in this area.

At least 800 Whooper Swans can be seen around the reserve and in local fields at the moment as well as up to 6000 Pink-footed Geese. Lots of duck around the reserve with recent counts of 3000 Teal, 3000 Mallard, 200 Pintail, 500 Shelduck, 47 Pochard, 52 Tufted Duck, 10 Gadwall, 10 Shoveler and 2-3 Goldeneye.

Good numbers of Ruff being seen with at least 70 being counted most afternoons at the 3pm feed in front of Discovery Hide, also with a few Black-tailed Godwits. Elsewhere around the reserve a recent count of 100 Snipe as well as 2 Jack Snipe in the same wet field at the end of the Community Reedbed Walk, also a small number of Woodcock regularly spend the winter on site with one recently being flushed close to the path in between Janet Kear and UU Hide. Good numbers of Lapwing on the reserve with at least 2000 birds present.

Plenty of small birds to be seen especially at the few feeding stations around the reserve especially from Janet Kear Hide including Tree Sparrow, Chaffinch, Greenfinch and Great Spotted Woodpecker. Coal Tit, Long-tailed Tit and Goldcrest can be seen as well.

 

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2496/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2496/#respond Wed, 02 Jan 2019 13:48:48 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85295 Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada goose
Barnacle goose
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal
Pochard
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
Grey heron
Great egret
Little egret
Black-tailed godwit
Redshank
Snipe
Lapwing
Golden plover
Great black-backed gull
Starling
Pied wagtail
Yellowhammer
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Fieldfare
Redwing
Stock dove
Pheasant
Rook
Kestrel
Marsh harrier
Buzzard
Short-eared owl

Mammals
Roe deer x 5

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Wildlife sightings – 02/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-02-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-02-01-19/#respond Wed, 02 Jan 2019 11:46:48 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85293 Wader Lake (AM, low tide):

Shelduck 7

Teal 26

Water rail (Paddy Fleming Hide) 1

Lapwing 65

Black-headed gull 13

Snipe 2

 

Saline lagoon (AM, low tide):

Grey heron 1

Curlew 1

Snipe 1

 

Hawthorn Wood feeding station:

Great-spotted woodpecker 3

Brambling 14 (site record)

Lesser redpoll 4

Reed bunting 1

Nuthatch 1

Willow tit 1

Siskin 1

Bullfinch 8

Goldfinch 3

Chaffinch 15

Great tit 7

Blue tit 10

 

Plus:

Mute swan over site 2

Kestrel on Wader Lake footpath 1

Redwing on Wader Lake footpath 16

Tufted duck at the reservoir 47

Long-tailed tit on Saline Lagoon footpath 6

Mistle thrush on Saline Lagoon footpath 1

Goosander on the River Wear 1

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7 Pintail displaying on the main lake https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/7-pintail-displaying-on-the-main-lake/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/7-pintail-displaying-on-the-main-lake/#respond Wed, 02 Jan 2019 09:53:30 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85285

2 Bittern – main lake N shore

1 Water Pipit – marsh

13 Redwing – entrance area

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

7 Pintail – main lake

8 Snipe – scrape(5), main lake(2), marsh(1). The group on the scrape flew in high from the NW a.m.

 

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 3 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Listen out for possible Bearded Tit in the reedbed; this species often appears during November/December. Alder and Birch trees across the reserve hold some mixed flocks of Goldfinch and occasional Siskin.

 

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Goshawk flyby https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/goshawk-flyby/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/goshawk-flyby/#respond Tue, 01 Jan 2019 17:26:53 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85280

Overview

A busy day for birds and people. Huge flocks of Wigeon, Lapwing and Golden Plover dominated from most hides With Curlew, Dunlin, Redshank and at least 21 Ruff among them. At least 11 Cranes on site and the usual pair of Peregrine and several buzzard were added to with a flyby from a Goshawk. A very bright Chiffchaff delighted everyone at the Martin Smith Hide as did a small group of Redpoll that have become very tame watch out for them in Alder and Birch trees throughout the collection bird area. Some great views of snipe at the Martin Smith, Rushy and Zeiss hide. The Dark Bellied Brent was with Canada’s and Barnacle’s on the Dumbles. Bewick’s Swans peaked at 99 overnight but conditions looking good for further migration over the next few days.

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7 Song Thrushes in full song this morning https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/7-song-thrushes-in-full-song-this-morning/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-london-sightings/7-song-thrushes-in-full-song-this-morning/#respond Tue, 01 Jan 2019 11:09:58 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85271  

Song Thrush by Russ Myners

 

3 Bittern – main lake (west, north and east shores)

1 Jack Snipe – scrape

71 Lapwing – main lake

7 Song Thrush – singing from sheltered lagoon, south route, entrance lake, wildside

24 Redwing – entrance area

3 Fieldfare – entrance area

1 Mistle Thrush – entrance area

185 Teal – site count

107 Wigeon – site count

106 Shoveler – site count

1 Red Kite – flew SE

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

 

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 3 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Listen out for possible Bearded Tit in the reedbed; this species often appears during November/December. Alder and Birch trees across the reserve hold some mixed flocks of Goldfinch and occasional Siskin.

 

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Wildlife sightings – 01/01/19 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-01-01-19/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-01-01-19/#respond Tue, 01 Jan 2019 10:53:08 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85266 Wader Lake (AM, mid-tide):

Teal 29

Shelduck 10

Black-headed gull 4

Redshank 2

Grey heron 3

Common snipe 1

Tufted duck 15

Goosander 1

 

Saline lagoon (AM, mid-tide):

Curlew (on lagoon and meadow) 52

Redshank 1

Grey heron 1

 

Hawthorn Wood feeding station:

Robin 2

Chaffinch 8

Bullfinch 9

Great-spotted woodpecker 2

Coal tit 2

Long-tailed tit 3

Brambling 3

Willow tit 1

Greenfinch 2

Goldfinch 2

Nuthatch 1

Siskin 1

Redpoll 3

 

Blackbird on Wader Lake footpath 9

Redwing on Wader Lake footpath 3

Goldeneye on the River Wear 1

Grey wagtail on the stream channel 1

Wren on the saline lagoon meadow path 1

Redpoll at the play area 36

Jay on Wader Lake footpath 1

Stock dove in the new nest box in the heron hedge

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2495/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2019/01/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2495/#respond Tue, 01 Jan 2019 10:48:11 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85267 Mute swan
Whooper swan
Greylag
Canada goose
White-fronted goose
Barnacle goose
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Gadwall
Teal
Pochard
Tufted duck
Goldeneye
Great crested grebe
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
Cranes x2 (flying overhead)
White stork (escapee)
Great egret
Little egret
Curlew
Black-tailed godwit
Ruff
Snipe
Dunlin
Lapwing
Golden plover
Black-headed gull
Lesser black backed gull
Great black backed gull
Herring gull
Starling
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Dunnock
Goldfinch
Great tit
Blue tit
Wren
Wood pigeon
Pheasant
Jackdaw
Magpie
Carrion crow
Kestrel
Sparrowhawk
Marsh harrier
Buzzard

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WWT Snapshot December 2018 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-news/wwt-snapshot-december-2018/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-news/wwt-snapshot-december-2018/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 15:44:07 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85260

Thank you to all our supporters for your time, passion and funding. Here is a shapshot of just some of the great conservation work you’ve helped WWT achieve in the last three months. Around the world In Madagascar, WWT and Durrell reintroduced one of the world’s rarest birds, the Madagascar pochard, into the wild for […]]]>

Thank you to all our supporters for your time, passion and funding. Here is a shapshot of just some of the great conservation work you’ve helped WWT achieve in the last three months.

Around the world

In Madagascar, WWT and Durrell reintroduced one of the world’s rarest birds, the Madagascar pochard, into the wild for the first time. 21 ducklings were placed in a specially-made floating aviary which will give them safe refuge as they get used to life in the wild.

In China, WWT Chief Executive Martin Spray was one of only two non-government representatives appointed to manage the future of the most threatened bird migration route on the planet. The East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership’s Management Committee has an oversight role for conservation work all the way from Alaska and Russia in the north to Australia and New Zealand in the south.

In Cambodia, there is news from two wetlands where WWT is working. Anlung Pring has been placed on a shortlist of potential sites in the country to be designated as Ramsar sites, thus receiving international protections. Meanwhile at nearby Boeung Prek Lapouv, a map has been produced to bring together habitat, biodiversity and livelihood information to support new zonation of the site in 2019.

In the United Arab Emirates, WWT and partners presented an open letter to the global Ramsar Convention to protect wetlands, urging greater action to include wetland conservation in world attempts to tackle climate change.

In the Netherlands, we presented our work to “headstart” one of the UK’s rarest breeding birds, the black-tailed godwit, at an international wader study group conference. Three of the birds we reared and released were also spotted in France, demonstrating the hand-reared birds are migrating as successfully as their wild-hatched counterparts.

Around the UK

In the South West of England, it was a record year for reintroduced cranes with 25 chicks fledging successfully, produced by 54 pairs. These are record numbers for cranes since they were last widespread across England in the 1600s.

WWT Chief Executive was appointed as Chair of England’s largest wildlife coalition, Wildlife & Countryside Link. WCL provides a joint voice in Westminster for 49 conservation organisations including National Trust, WWF-UK and RSPB, as well as around 8 million members.

At Westminster, WWT staff and volunteers unveiled a banner calling for a strong Green Bill, backed by thousands of online e-actions. Later that week the Government published its draft Environment Bill.

In Cardiff, WWT welcomed the decision by Welsh Government to ban the shooting of Greenland white-fronted geese. There are similar plans to ban its shooting in England, which would see it finally protected in every country along its migration route.

At our wetland centres

At London, a survey for water voles found around 88 of them in the reserve, with two main colonies in the Waterlife and Wildside areas. WWT has created enough perfect habitat for them that we hope the number might rise to as high as 200 in coming years.

Water vole photographed by Karen Diton.

Also at London, a new “wild walk” is now open. Its finale is a flexible wooden bridge slung low enough to be able to bounce on it so it splashes in the water.

At Slimbridge, 20 adult eels were caught and fitted with tags. A reader attached to a water channel leading to the River Severn will record if or when the eels “check out” to depart to the Sargasso Sea to spawn. This is part of a project to find out how well eels are managing to get past flood barriers to move between rivers and the sea.

Also at Slimbridge, external works to renovate Sir Peter Scott’s house and studio were completed ahead of migratory birds arriving to spend the winter outside its windows. The house is due to open to the public in late 2019.

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Lots of snipe and a some lapwing https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-arundel-sightings/lots-of-snipe-and-a-some-lapwing/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-arundel-sightings/lots-of-snipe-and-a-some-lapwing/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 15:03:42 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85255

Snipe tucked into the reeds in front of the Ramsar hide Photo: Richard Allan

Recent sightings by WWT wardens at Arundel Wetland Centre.

Dec 24

Ramsar hide: 90 snipe, 11 lapwing, 2 wigeon, 2 peregrine, and 18 pochard.

Scrape hide: 1 water rail

 

Dec 26

Wetlands Discovery: 1 kingfisher.

Ramsar hide: 68 snipe, 14 lapwing, and 10 pochard

Lapwing hide: 7 snipe, 1 shoveler

Scrape hide: 11 shelduck, 6 snipe, 1 water rail, and 1 kingfisher.

Reedbed hide: great spotted woodpecker

 

Dec 27

Ramsar hide: 65 snipe, 3 lapwing, 4 wigeon, and 45 teal

Lapwing hide: 4 lapwing, 2 snipe

Scrape hide: 12 shoveler, 2 little grebe, 1 kingfisher, and 4 snipe

Reedbed: kingfisher

 

Dec 28

Ramsar hide: 27 snipe, 13 pochard, 2 grey heorn, 3 little egret, 13 teal, 8 lapwing, 4 tufted duck, 3 shoveler, 9 shelduck, 3 cormorant.

Scrape hide: water rail, 3 teal, 2 shelduck, 2 little grebe, 1 kingfisher

Woodland Loop: water rail

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 7 teal, 1 grey heron, 1 cormorant

 

Dec 29

Ramsar hide: 22 snipe, grey heron, 22 teal, 3 cormorant, 8 lapwing, 2 common gull, 3 tufted ducks, 4 shelduck, 8 shoveler, 10 pochard, 1 gadwall

Lapwing hide: 2 lapwing, 1 grey heron, 1 water rail

Scrape hide: 10 teal, 1 gadwall, 1 little grebe, 2 shoveler

Arun Riverlife lagoon: 1 grey heron, 1 cormorant

 

Dec 31

Ramsar hide: 9 teal, 13 snipe, 1 grey heron, 9 pochard, 12 shelduck, 19 tufted duck, 2 cormorant, 4 gadwall, 1 little egret, 1 kingfisher.

Lapwing hide: 4 teal, 11 snipe

Scrape hide: 2 gadwall, 2 shoveler, 2 shelduck, 3 teal, water rail

Reedbed hide: goldcrest.

Wildlife garden: goldcrests

Arun Riverlife lagoon: grey heron, little egret.

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End of the year https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/end-of-the-year/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/end-of-the-year/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 14:18:19 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85251 Rushy Hide

98 Bewick’s Swans present at the roost before moving out to the Tack Piece for the day.

Martin Smith Hide

At least three Snipe and two Water Rail skulking in or near cover. Lot’s of wildfowl are moving out to this pool for the day, it offers really good views of Pintail and Wigeon in particular. Oystercatcher on the Wigeon ‘lawns’ among the grazing ducks and Lapwing.

Robbie Garnett/Stephen Kirk Hides

Really good birding from mid to late morning and through the afternoon. The puddles and pasture attracting 700+ Golden Plover, 2000 Lapwing, 34 Redshank, 60 Curlew, 20+ Ruff, 98 European White-fronted Geese, 100+ Greylag, 500+ Wigeon with a pair of Stock Dove around the Goose House and four Magpie hanging around along the Rushy Pen fenceline.

Willow Withy Bed/Duck Decoy

A Chiffchaff was calling and showing along the fenceline mid morning. A party of Teal fed in the shallows.

Willow Hide

A female Reed Bunting was among the visitors to the feeding station.

Holden Tower

Two Peregrine on the fences, 6 Cranes and two separated flocks of Canada Geese, the flock favouring the south end of the Dumbles (Warth/Royal Drift) hosted the Dark-bellied Brent Goose. 30 Pintail were roosting on the Severn with 110 Lesser Black-backed and 10 Great-Black-backed Gull were sleeping on a sandbar to the N of Middle Point. Looking over the fence to the East into the Long Ground Pool revealed very good numbers of duck including Gadwall, Pochard and the male Pochard x Ferrugionus Duck hybrid.

Grounds

A flock of Chaffinch and Goldfinch continues to feed in the alder trees, keep an eye out for Lesser Redpolls. A couple Goldcrests were showing in the North American Pen.

South Lake

Black-tailed Godwit increased to 104 and the two Avocets remained, as is usual Lapwing numbers were in the 100s with a few Snipe in the rushes. 140+ Shoveler, 120+ Teal and 40 Shelduck present. The deep lake held a gathering of Pochard and Tufted Duck as well as a Grey Heron and a few Cormorants.

Zeiss Hide

28 Ruff were among the 100s of Lapwing before 0930 but dispersed later. A few Snipe were roosting on the rush islands and 100s of Teal and Wigeon were on the flood and ‘lawns’. A male Kestrel was on the

 

 

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Recent Sightings €- 31st December 2018 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-%c2%80-31st-december-2018/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-castle-espie-sightings/recent-sightings-%c2%80-31st-december-2018/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 12:49:37 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85244 Count taken  at High-Mid tide this morning.

It was a real treat on the reserve this morning to find Peregrine falcons zooming over the brickworks. Not unusual birds to see in NI but are infrequent visitors to Castle Espie. Their large size, long pointed wings and sheer speed make them a spectacular sight to see. They gave a display of their acrobatic flying skills as the dived and swooped along the edge of the estuary; hoping to snatch up some of the small regular waders for a meal. A real special treat for us here in Castle Espie. Always been on alert when out on the reserve, one never knows what treats nature may have in store.

Young Peregrine Falcon.

Estuary – visible from the Brent Hide and the Limekiln Observatory

Brent Goose 17, Shelduck 103, Wigeon 15, Oystercatcher 2, Redshank 107, Knot 125, Dunlin 5, Black-headed Gull 4, Herring Gull 1

Main lake – visible from Sensory garden and Visitor centre

Mallard c.350, Mute Swan 1, Tufted Duck 23, Gadwall 5, Pintail 2, Teal 18, Moorhen 3, Coot 4

Shingle bank – visible from Sensory garden, Wadermarsh and Visitor Centre

Mallard 12, Black-headed Gull 12

Wadermarsh – visible from Wadermarsh lookout and Brent Hide

Moorhen 5, Black-headed Gull 12

Freshwater Lagoon – visible from Brent Hide and Crannóg

Mallard 39, Shoveler 8, Pintail 1, Moorhen 4, Coot 1

Saline Lagoon – visible from Limekiln observatory

Little Grebe 2, Little Egret 1, Greenshank 10

Limestone Lake

Song Thrush (on lake verge)

Peninsula Field and Saltmarsh

Shelduck 2

Brickworks

Blackbird, Song Thrush, Jackdaw, Peregrine 2

Woodland

Blackbird, Wren, Dunnock, Wood pigeon, Jay, Robin, Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, Chaffinch, Bullfinch, Goldfinch, Goldcrest, Song Thrush, Mistle Thrush, House Sparrow

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Today’s sightings https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2494/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-sightings-2494/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 12:35:02 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85242 Mute swan
Whooper swan
Bewick’s swan
Greylag goose
Canada goose
White-fronted goose x5
Shelduck
Mallard
Pochard
Gadwall
Tufted duck
Pintail
Ringed teal
Moorhen
Cormorant
White stork (escapee)
Great egret
Little egret
Black-tailed godwit
Dunlin x13
Lapwing
Ruff
Stonechat
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
House sparrow
Goldfinch
Great tit
Blue tit
Starling
Barn owl x2
Short eared owl x3
Marsh harrier

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Reserve Update Monday 31st December https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-monday-31st-december/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-monday-31st-december/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:21:41 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85239 Usual suspects around this morning, waders in the fields, ducks on the ponds and Yellowhammers in the hedgerow!  Hen Harriers were around yesterday with two male birds observed foraging over the outer merses.  Tomorrow we will be holding our annual New Year’s Day bird race.  Come along and see how many birds you can spot around the reserve in a day.  Normal opening time and charges apply.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 92 (including 13 cygnets)
Mute Swan 55 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 116
Mallard 108
Tufted Duck 19
Greater Scaup 1
Teal 16
Wigeon 95
Moorhen 8

Folly Pond
Teal 474
Wigeon 126
Shoveler 24
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4
Canada Goose 33
Greylag goose 1

Teal Pond
Wigeon 10
Mallard 19
Barnacle Goose 31

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

rhiannon.hatfield@wwt.org.uk

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Wildlife Sightings – 31/12/18 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-31-12-18/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-31-12-18/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:20:44 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85238 Wader Lake     Time/AM     Tide/Mid

Shelduck – 8

Teal – 46

Grey Heron – 5 (1 juvenile)

Water Rail – 1 (Paddy Fleming hide)

Snipe – 2

Lapwing – 37

Black-headed Gull – 15

 

Saline Lagoon

Curlew – 1

Grey Heron – 1

Teal – 56

Redshank – 2

 

Hawthorn Wood

Siskin – 1

Reed Bunting – 1 (male)

Lesser Redpoll – 2

Treecreeper – 1

Brambling – 5

Great Spotted Woodpecker – 1 (female)

Bullfinch – 8

Chaffinch – 12

Goldfinch – 3

Great Tit – 9

Blue Tit – 7

Coal Tit – 2

 

Other Birds Noted Around Site

Tufted Duck (reservoir) – 42

Kestrel (amphibian ponds) – 1 (female)

Long-tailed Tit (stream channel) – 8

Redwing (wader lake footpath) – 12

Mistle Thrush (saline lagoon footpath) – 2

Grey Heron (River Wear) – 2

 

Other Wildlife Species

Flora:

Turkeytail fungus (hawthorn wood)

Candlesnuff fungus (pen 1)

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Fieldfare around the entrance area https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-london-sightings/fieldfare-around-the-entrance-area/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-london-sightings/fieldfare-around-the-entrance-area/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:10:50 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85236

1 Bittern – main lake (North shore)

2 Shelduck – wader scrape

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

4 Pintail – main lake

1 Jack Snipe – wader scrape

16 Redwing – 4 on south route, 12 flew over West

9 Fieldfare – entrance lake

1 Peregrine – perched on Charing Cross Hospital on the opposite side of the river

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 3 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Listen out for possible Bearded Tit in the reedbed; this species often appears during November/December. Alder and Birch trees across the reserve hold some mixed flocks of Goldfinch and occasional Siskin.

 

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Goldeneye on the reservoir lagoon https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-london-sightings/goldeneye-on-the-reservoir-lagoon/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-london-sightings/goldeneye-on-the-reservoir-lagoon/#respond Mon, 31 Dec 2018 10:04:09 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85234

1 Bittern – main lake

1 Goldeneye – reservoir lagoon

2 Shelduck – wader scrape

4 Pintail – main lake

1 Water Pipit – grazing marsh

December bird highlights: Shelduck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Bittern, Great White Egret, Snipe, Black-tailed Godwit, Jack Snipe, Little Owl, Peregrine, Red Kite, Yellow-legged Gull, Brambling, Water Pipit, Skylark, Rock Pipit.

Bitterns (up to 3 birds so far) can be found mostly on the main lake shores, particularly the north shore. The flooded wader scrape and marsh have plenty of feeding winter duck including Pintail, Shoveler, Wigeon and Teal, as well as Jack Snipe, Snipe and Water Pipit. Also on the main lake there’s been occasional Yellow-legged Gull, hunting Peregrine, Water Rail, Snipe and Lapwing. Gadwall and Goldeneye can be found on the reservoir lagoon. Listen out for possible Bearded Tit in the reedbed; this species often appears during November/December. Alder and Birch trees across the reserve hold some mixed flocks of Goldfinch and occasional Siskin.

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Peregrine battles https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/peregrine-battles/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/peregrine-battles/#respond Sun, 30 Dec 2018 17:26:33 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85225 Three Peregrine Falcons were again battling it out over the reserve and grounds this morning. Our winter resident pair have had to chase off this individual or other intruders a number of times this winter. They are highly vocal and acrobatic when these battles take place, listen out for the piercing calls high overhead, the only drawback is they tend to flush the birds over the reserve in panic. The ‘local’ pair settled back on the Dumbles after seeing off the visitor.

Rushy Hide

At least 90 Bewick’s Swans present at dawn as well as 400 Lapwing and the assembled Pochard, Tufted Duck, Mallard, Pintail and Shelduck. The hybrid Pochard x Ferruginous Duck male was also present here today.

Martin Smith Hide

Great viewing over the Tack Piece later in the morning, plenty of duck came into this pool to spend the day and at least 5 Snipe were on view. Cetti’s Warbler and Water Rail showed here in the sunshine.

Robbie Garnett Hide/Stephen Kirk Hide

Great views of the E. White-fronted Geese today with at least 80 feeding here with the Bewick’s Swans and Greylags. Lapwing and Golden Plover flocks built up through the day and 15+ Ruff and 15+ Redshank were joined by Dunlin at 52 Curlew on the puddles and floods.

Holden Tower

Twelve Cranes included one un-ringed adult and two juveniles. The Dark-bellied Brent Goose was viewable at great distance among the Canada Goose flock.

South Lake

Very busy today with six Pintail, 5 Wigeon, Little Egret, Kingfisher, Great Crested Grebe, 30 Pochard, 181 Shoveler, 1 Oystercatcher, 450 Lapwing, 1 Snipe, 75 Black-tailed Godwit, 3 Ruff and 2 returning Avocets among the other waterbirds.

Top New Piece and Bottom New Piece

Unfortunately nearly all the birds we flushed by a walker with a dog, the majority moving out to the Severn. 19 Greylags seen on the hide round included two larger, bulkier birds. Numbers of birds recovered later in the day.

South Finger filtration beds

A Water Rail was feeding in the open near the dragonfly pool (larger Northern pool) and a Great Spotted Woodpecker was feeding on the logs near the benches.

General

A flock of 240+ Fieldfare were feeding on fields N of the Tack Piece and a few Redpoll were seen and heard  flying over today.

 

 

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Today’s Highlights https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-544/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-544/#respond Sun, 30 Dec 2018 12:05:43 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85222 Bewick’s swan
Whooper swan
Mute swan
Greylag
Canada geese
White fronted geese
Egyptian geese x 2
Shelduck
Shoveler
Mallard
Pintail
Wigeon
Teal
Ringed teal
Pochard
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Coot
Moorhen
White stork
Great white egret
Little egret
Curlew
Black-tailed godwit
Ruff
Redshank
Snipe
Dunlin
Lapwing
Golden plover
Black-headed gull
Starling
Reed bunting
Tree sparrow
Goldfinch
Linnet
Great tit
Blue tit
Stonechat
Green woodpecker
Kestrel
Marsh harrier
Buzzard
Little owl
Barn owl

Mammals
Brown hare
Roe deer
Muntjac

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Reserve Update Sunday 30th December https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-sunday-30th-december/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-caerlaverock-sightings/reserve-update-sunday-30th-december/#respond Sun, 30 Dec 2018 10:26:39 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85220 Exciting afternoon yesterday with reports of a small Canada Goose mixed in with the Barnacle Goose flock down at Avenue Tower.  There has been a Todd’s Canada Goose over on the Cumbrian coast so it could presumably be the same bird.  A period of wild goose chasing has ensued and we have not yet managed to catch up with it again.  There are good flocks of Barnies in Corner field and Newfield along with good numbers of waders and ducks.

Named Whooper Swan arrivals:

YHS – Solway Siren
Lost Darvic – Hagar
YJL – Linda H
YSJ – Sheldon Whooper
ZVY – Orchid
YFS – Obi Swan Kenobi
Lost Darvic – Princess Layer
XLN – Gylfi
YFU – Magnus
YHV- Wowsie (+ 1 cygnet)
ZXJ – Ruth C (+ 4 cygnets)
Z6L – Rooby & Z7S – Bowie (+ 2 cygnets)
Z5N – Andy
YFB – Eric Anthony
YTC – Margaret Ruth
Z9F – Hendrik
APR – Elsie Barbara
YRG – Lucky Linda
ZJA – Annabel
YRS – Stephen
YSK – Countess of Boulogne
YFF – Solway Annie
ZXP – Mary
ZGT – Butterbur
YRN – Douglas Flintoff
YSF – Topsy
Lost darvic – Kate Two
Lost darvic – New York Lady
Lost darvic – Atty
Lost darvic – Renfrew
Lost darvic – Paisley
Lost darvic – Aspen
APC – George
YFP – Bekah Jo (+ 3 cygnets)
YHH – Lady Ela (+ 1 cygnet)
XKA – Eleanor
Z6R – Archie
YPH – McMurdoston
YTF – Odette
YPV – McNoo
ZKZ – Hector
Lost Darvic – Snoopy
YRH – Rufus
Lost Darvic – Silje
Lost Darvic – Blackbill Cupcake
Lost Darvic – Suzanne
Lost Darvic – T. J. Whooper
Lost Darvic – Whoopie

Around the reserve:

Whooper Pond
Whooper Swan 139 (including 21 cygnets)
Mute Swan 63 (including 10 cygnets)
Canada Goose 127
Mallard 62
Tufted Duck 31
Greater Scaup 1
Teal 11
Wigeon 43
Moorhen 6
Oystercatcher 2

Folly Pond
Teal 474
Wigeon 126
Shoveler 24
Mallard 45
Shelduck 10
Redshank 2
Black-tailed Godwit 4
Canada Goose 33
Greylag goose 1

Teal Pond
Teal 3
Mallard 13
Barnacle Goose 23

Avenue Tower
Mallard
Teal
Shoveler
Wigeon
Gadwall
Pintail
Curlew
Lapwing
Golden Plover
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Barnacle Geese
Longhorn Cattle 2

Saltcot Merse Observatory
Pink-footed Geese
Barnacle Geese
Greylag Geese
Canada Geese
Peregrine
Merlin
Hen Harrier
Buzzard
Mute Swan
Shelduck
Mallard
Lapwing
Oystercatcher
Curlew
Little Egret
Great Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Common Gull
Herring Gull
Hebridean Sheep 12

Avenues & Feeders
(notable species)
Yellowhammer
Bullfinch

Reed Bunting
Sparrowhawk
Coal Tit
Great Tit
Blue Tit
Robin
Blackbird
Chaffinch
Long-tailed Tit
Goldfinch
Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Treecreeper
Song Thrush
Great-spotted Woodpecker
Goldcrest

Webcam

The winter webcam is now showing the Whooper Pond during the day and the badger feeding area from 5pm onwards.

https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/experience/webcam/

Twitter & Facebook

Follow us on Twitter @WWTCaerlaverock for instant WWT Caerlaverock bird news, wildlife news and upcoming events to your mobile phone or computer. This is a great way to get instant news as we update from our mobile phones as we are finding the birds.

You can also ‘Like’ us on Facebook https://www.wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/caerlaverock/

rhiannon.hatfield@wwt.org.uk

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Raptors https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/raptors-11/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-martin-mere-sightings/raptors-11/#respond Sat, 29 Dec 2018 15:51:56 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85216 Still excellent at the moment for birds of prey with a juvenile Peregrine showing very well on and off all day, still at least 1 female Merlin, 3+ Marsh Harrier also several Common Buzzard including a pale bird and the usual Kestrel and Sparrowhawk sightings. A Barn Owl has been hunting around the far side of the Mere the last two afternoons as well.

Still a few Goldeneye being seen around the reserve, mainly on the Mere. A good count of 100 Common Snipe and 2 Jack Snipe in the flooded field at the end of the Community Reedbed Walk, also up to 3 Corn Bunting in this area.

A Mediterranean Gull was seen yesterday from Harrier Hide.

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Recent sightings 23rd-29th December https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-23rd-29th-december/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-llanelli-sightings/recent-sightings-23rd-29th-december/#respond Sat, 29 Dec 2018 12:59:23 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85198

Long-tailed Tit Cr. Russ Myners

British Steel Hide

Our usual group of Waders have been seen from the Steel hide this week, including 375 Black-tailed Godwit, 153 Lapwing, 441 Shelduck and 72 Wigeon. The Spoonbill continues to make regular appearances. A group of 25 Golden Plover have been spotted on Saturday the 29th.

 

Millennium Wetlands

A wide variety of waterfowl has been seen over the Christmas period. 82 Teal, 45 Gadwall, 62 Lapwing and 140 Black-tailed Godwit. Also seen around the wetlands has been small groups of Shoveler, Tufted duck, Snipe and Redshank. Seen around the feeders near the hides has been Greenfinch, Chaffinch as well as the usual Blue tit, Great Tit and optimistic Grey Squirrels. Seen on the northern loop of the site has been groups of Long-Tailed Tit and Goldfinches.

 

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Today’s Highlights https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-543/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-welney-sightings/todays-highlights-543/#respond Sat, 29 Dec 2018 12:19:49 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85210 Water rail
Tree sparrow
Goldfinch
Mute swan
Whooper swan
Bewick’s swan
Shoveler
Shelduck
Pochard
Wigeon
Coot
Moorhen
Greylag geese
Canada geese
Barnacle goose
Black-tailed godwit
Mallard
Pintail
Tufted duck
Cormorant
Goldeneye
Ruff
Lapwing
Marsh harrier
Reed bunting
Golden plover
Curlew
Great white egret
Buzzard
Kestrel
Magpie
Black-headed gull
Meadow pipit
Peregrine x 2
Linnet
Wren
Stonechat
Lesser black-backed gull
Dunlin
Green woodpecker
Teal
White fronted geese x 6
Little egret
Starling
Barn owl

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Wildlife sightings – 29/12/18 https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-29-12-18/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-washington-sightings/wildlife-sightings-29-12-18/#respond Sat, 29 Dec 2018 11:47:23 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85207 Wader Lake (AM, high tide):

Water rail 1

Teal 53

Grey heron 4

Shelduck 15

Curlew 40

Northern shoveler 3

Greylag 35

 

Saline lagoon (AM, high tide):

Curlew 43

Teal 48

Grey heron 2

Redshank 1

Shelduck 2

 

Hawthorn Wood feeding station:

Great-spotted woodpecker 2

Chaffinch 17

Bullfinch 14

Blue tit 9

Robin 2

Brambling 4

Great tit 7

Redpoll 1

Goldfinch 11

Nuthatch 1

Coal tit 2

 

Plus:

Woodcock on Hidden Meadow 1

Cormorant on the River Wear 1

Tufted duck at the reservoir 7

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Lots of Shovelers https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/lots-of-shovelers/ https://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/2018/12/wwt-slimbridge-sightings/lots-of-shovelers/#respond Sat, 29 Dec 2018 11:21:45 +0000 http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/?p=85203 South Lake

An impressive 184 Shoveler here this morning and a good selection of waders with Black Tailed Godwit 52, Ruff 17, Dunlin 45 the single oystercatcher and a handfull of Snipe. Most impressive though was around 700 very noisy and flighty Lapwings.

Rushy

Busy here with 93 Bewick’s overnight the usual Pintail, Pochard and Tufted Duck, around 90 Teal and a great little flock of 18 Snipe along the left hand side. The Lapwing flock was spectacular when a Peregrine was hunting in the Tack Piece lots of low level flybys and hundreds seeking refuge around the ponds.

Holden Tower

A single snipe showing well at the Martin Smith Hide a water Rail and excellent close up views of Teal and Wigeon. The Robbie Garnet had Pintail very close, another 13 Shoveler to add to the total, Pochard several hundred Teal and Wigeon. A flock of 21 Redshank were close and a single Ruff. A group of 32 Curlew were among an estimated 2200 lapwing and Golden Plover were pouring in from 09.30 (at least 500 and counting). The Two Peregrine that had caused all the excitment were on the cross fence, the Brent Goose was among Canada’s and Barnacle’s best of all the 105 Whitefronted Geese were close to the Holden Tower. Long Ground pool to the south was packed with 380 Tufted Duck and 52 Pochard.

Zeiss Hide

Four lovely Roe Deer, thousands of Wigeon and Lapwings, other waders were Ruff 4, Black tailed Godwit 17, G0lden Plover 14 but only 1 Snipe. Cettis singing a very active hunting Peregrine and a Raven flew over.

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