WWT Caerlaverock

The Caerlaverock area is home to breeding ospreys that have arrived every summer since 2006. They've successfully reared 15 chicks to fledge to date.

The Caerlaverock area is home to breeding ospreys that have arrived every summer since 2006. They've successfully reared 15 chicks to fledge to date.

The Caerlaverock Osprey Project is a joint project between Forestry Commission Scotland and WWT.

We have live images beamed from the nest on the big screens in the Visitor Centre at Caerlaverock and also on this webpage from 10am to 4pm. The nest is in a very remote location and the camera system is powered by solar panels so we hope to increase the viewing time as daylight hours increase.

So far we have had no sightings on the nest but the birds should arrive very soon. We will update the comments below as the action unfolds. The Caerlaverock ospreys tend to arrive a little later than some of the birds that breed further north. Going by previous years, the first week of April is a good bet for first arrivals.


2017 season

On Sunday 9th April, thanks to the live images from our nest camera, we saw the female osprey ringed white TR and her unringed mate arrive on the nest. This was the pair that successfully raised two chicks from this nest last year. They took over their nest from another pair which had arrived a few days earlier, a pair that we had seen breed successfully at another nest site in the area in previous years, male yellow 80 and his mate. Hopefully they found another nest site not too far away. White TR was ringed as one of a brood of three in the vicinity of Mintlaw, Aberdeenshire in 2008. She's nine years old now and last year was the first sighting of her since she was ringed as a chick.

The first of three eggs was laid on the 22nd of April, the second on the 24th & 3rd on the 27th. Incubation went well and the male bird brought in a lot of fish, mainly flounders. The first egg hatched out on the 28th of May, the second followed on the 30th and the 3rd on the 1st of June. The chicks developed very quickly on the excellent service of fish from the male, so much so that there was very little difference in size and no bullying of the younger sibling. They were ringed by the FCS rangers with blue plastic leg rings with white characters. PY5, PY6 and PY7. PY5 & PY6 are male birds and PY7 a female. PY5 and PY7 were also fitted with satellite tags which you can now follow on www.societe.org.gg/movetech/ospreys2017/

By the end of September both were well on their way south for the winter. PY5 was last seen in northern Portugal on the 10th of October and we have had no further fixes from the tag, hopefully the bird is still OK and it is an equipment malfunction. PY7 flew all the way south to The Gambia and was last seen on the 2nd of October, as with its sibling we hope it is just a malfunction of the tag. You can look at their tracks south with some of the other Scottish ospreys at www.societe.org.gg/movetech/ospreys2017/  PY5 is tag 635 and PY7 is tag 634. They will probably stay in Africa next year returning in spring 2019 but some young ospreys have been known to return after one winter in Africa.
 


The Caerlaverock Osprey Project is a joint project between Forestry Commission Scotland and WWT

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